domestic violence

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domestic violence

n.
Physical or emotional abuse of a household member, especially one's spouse or domestic partner.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

domes′tic vi′olence


n.
acts of violence against a member of one's immediate family, esp. in the home.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.domestic violence - violence or physical abuse directed toward your spouse or domestic partnerdomestic violence - violence or physical abuse directed toward your spouse or domestic partner; usually violence by men against women
violence, force - an act of aggression (as one against a person who resists); "he may accomplish by craft in the long run what he cannot do by force and violence in the short one"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The battered child was then taken to a local hospital and from there to the Kolencherry Medical College but local reports said Anand and her partner delayed emergency medical procedures by initially refusing to sign on documents giving permission to the doctors to go ahead with the treatment.
Henry Kempe's studies on the "battered child syndrome" in 1962 served to underscore the physician's role in exposing child maltreatment, and 1973 saw the enactment of the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, which set standards for mandatory reporting as a condition for federal funding.
The group, which was established in 2014, was reportedly founded by its leader Sonny Boy Ssadjarin, who grew up as a battered child in the hands of his father.
The order added that there should be no need for suo motu notice to make the criminal justice system function for a battered child, regardless of the person accused of having committed the offence.
The landmark article describing the Battered Child Syndrome was published in 1962.
The battered child syndrome consists of a constellation of signs that may be either apparent or covert.
'The Case of the Battered Child' is still among the well-to-do of an earlier era.
In 1962, Henry Kempe described the clinical signs of physical abuse of children and was the first to present the "battered child syndrome" concept (3).
Definitions including "battered child syndrome", "shaken baby" and "shaken baby syndrome" are used to describe physical abuse resulting in brain and head injury in children (1).
Drawing on work by James Garbarino, Edna Guttman and Janis Wilson Seeley in The Psychologically Battered Child, Rand described five types of parental behaviour that are hallmarks of parental alienation syndrome:
The sources added that the words of the battered child were taken by the committee of security investigation, confirming suspicions that his father was the one who beat him up.
The battered child's remains include a partially healed skull fracture probably caused by a deliberate blow to the head that the youngster survived for about a week.