battered woman syndrome


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Related to battered woman syndrome: domestic violence, Emotional abuse

battered woman syndrome

n.
A set of signs and symptoms, such as fearfulness and a feeling of helplessness, seen in some women who are physically, verbally, or emotionally abused over an extended period by a husband or partner. Also called battered women's syndrome.
Translations

battered woman syndrome

n. síndrome de la mujer maltratada, abuso continuo físico o psicológico infringido en una mujer por su marido o amante.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wyoming's statute is the most prescriptive, admitting expert testimony on Battered Woman Syndrome but defining Battered Woman Syndrome as "a subset under the diagnosis of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder established in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders III-Revised of the American Psychiatric Association.
The Christel court generally recognizes the admissibility of expert testimony on battered woman syndrome but qualifies its holding, emphasizing "that the admissibility of syndrome evidence is limited to a description of the uniqueness of a specific behavior brought out at trial.
The battered woman syndrome is a psychological consequence of abuse.
After expanding the concept of imminence, Schopp turns his attention to the current formulation and use of the battered woman syndrome to support battered women's self-defense claims.
In Florida a new clemency board rule "recognizes that the battered woman syndrome is a significant factor for consideration of clemency.
Sensitive to these developments, the authors provide a sophisticated analysis of the relationship between law and psychology in the context of both the battered woman syndrome and postpartum psychosis as they are raised as defenses in gendered crimes.
Downs is correct when he argues that the content of expert testimony should move beyond battered woman syndrome.
Here, evidence of prior misconduct and/or the battered woman syndrome may be probative of self-defense.
First of all, battered woman syndrome evidence is somewhat different from what we like to suggest that prosecutors use, which is battered woman framework evidence.
Twenty-five papers consider a range of topics, including the views of adolescent girls concerning violence in their community, violence and status games among adolescents, cyberspace violence, international perspectives on sexual harassment of college students, empirical findings concerning battered woman syndrome, violence and exploitation against women and girls with disabilities, violence against women as a public health issue, cultural beliefs and domestic violence, domestic violence in Israel, violence against women in Mexico, and United Nations measures to stop violence against women.
For example, it has been observed that the conditions of "learned helplessness" and "cycle of violence" that constitute the Battered Woman Syndrome (174) operate to the detriment of those women who kill their abusers but have not conformed exactly to the behavioral model established.