battle-axe


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

bat·tle-axe

or bat·tle-ax (băt′l-ăks′)
n.
1. A heavy broad-headed axe formerly used as a weapon.
2. Derogatory A woman considered to be overbearing.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

battle-axe

n
1. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) (formerly) a large broad-headed axe
2. informal an argumentative domineering woman
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.battle-axe - a sharp-tongued domineering wifebattle-axe - a sharp-tongued domineering wife  
married woman, wife - a married woman; a man's partner in marriage
2.battle-axe - a broadax used as a weaponbattle-axe - a broadax used as a weapon    
broadax, broadaxe - a large ax with a broad cutting blade
halberd - a pike fitted with an ax head
Lochaber ax - a battle-ax formerly used by Scottish Highlanders
poleax, poleaxe - a battle ax used in the Middle Ages; a long handled ax and a pick
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

battle-axe

noun harridan, witch, fury, nag, scold, virago, shrew, tartar, disciplinarian, vixen, termagant, ballbreaker (slang) an old battle-axe who hasn't smiled in decades
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

battle-ax

or battle-axe
noun
Informal. A person, traditionally a woman, who persistently nags or criticizes:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

battle-axe

battle-ax (US) [ˈbætlæks] N
1. (= weapon) → hacha f de guerra
2. (= woman) → arpía f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

battle-axe

[ˈbætlˌæks] n (pej) she was a terrible old battle-axeera proprio un carabiniere
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
With one hand he plunged his spear into the compact ranks of his enemies, and with the other mowed large spaces in them with his battle-axe. Suddenly he flung away his war-club, red with blood, rushed upon a wounded warrior, and, chopping off his arm at a single stroke, carried the dissevered member to his mouth, and bit it again and again.
Meanwhile, the massacre continued on both sides, with battle-axes and war-clubs; as quickly as one of the combatants fell, a hostile warrior ran up to cut off his head, while the women, mingling in the fray, gathered up these bloody trophies, and piled them together at either extremity of the battle-field.
Advancing to the door of the hut we ordered that they should be admitted, and presently three men entered, each bearing a shining shirt of chain armour, and a magnificent battle-axe.
Then strapping our revolvers round our waists, and taking in our hands the battle-axes which the king had sent with the armour, we started.
But when Robert Bruce, on the black pony, rose in his stirrups, and lifting his good battle-axe, cracked at once the helmet and the skull of the too hasty knight at Bannockburn, then Tom felt all the exaltation of sympathy, and if he had had a cocoanut at hand, he would have cracked it at once with the poker.
They went clothed in steel and equipped with sword and lance and battle-axe, and if they couldn't persuade a person to try a sewing-machine on the installment plan, or a melodeon, or a barbed-wire fence, or a prohibition journal, or any of the other thousand and one things they canvassed for, they removed him and passed on.
FROM now on the old man devoted himself to the training of the boy in the handling of his lance and battle-axe, but each day also a period was allotted to the sword, until, by the time the youth had turned sixteen, even the old man himself was as but a novice by comparison with the marvelous skill of his pupil.
I fear, mon gar., that they have taught thee but badly at Beaulieu, for surely a bishop knows more of what is right and what is ill than an abbot can do, and I myself with these very eyes saw the Bishop of Lincoln hew into a Scottish hobeler with a battle-axe, which was a passing strange way of showing him that he loved him."
On one side of the saddle hung a short battle-axe, richly inlaid with Damascene carving; on the other the rider's plumed head-piece and hood of mail, with a long two-handed sword, used by the chivalry of the period.
The electric lights upon their brows gleamed brightly, their battle-axes were poised as if to strike down their foes; yet they remained motionless as statues, awaiting the word of command.
If, by any extraordinary chance, there was no war going, then they got up a deadly family feud with the next-door neighbor, and if, in spite of this, they still had a few spare moments on their hands, they occupied them with discussions as to whose sweetheart was the best looking, the arguments employed on both sides being battle-axes, clubs, etc.
On the walls, over the doors, on the ceiling, were swords, daggers, Malay creeses, maces, battle-axes; gilded, damasked, and inlaid suits of armor; dried plants, minerals, and stuffed birds, their flame-colored wings outspread in motionless flight, and their beaks forever open.