bawdy

(redirected from bawdier)
Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to bawdier: raunchiness, bawdiest

bawd·y

 (bô′dē)
adj. bawd·i·er, bawd·i·est
Humorously coarse; lewd or risqué: "[Mae West] became known for her humorous bawdy, suggestive performances and wisecracks" (Pam Cornelison & Ted Yanak).

bawd′i·ly adv.
bawd′i·ness n.

bawdy

(ˈbɔːdɪ)
adj, bawdier or bawdiest
(of language, plays, etc) containing references to sex, esp to be humorous
n
obscenity or eroticism, esp in writing or drama
ˈbawdily adv
ˈbawdiness n

bawd•y

(ˈbɔ di)

adj. bawd•i•er, bawd•i•est,
n. adj.
1. indecent; lewd; obscene.
n.
2. coarse or obscene talk or writing.
[1505–15]
bawd′i•ly, adv.
bawd′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bawdy - lewd or obscene talk or writing; "it was smoking-room bawdry"; "they published a collection of Elizabethan bawdy"
dirty word, obscenity, smut, filth - an offensive or indecent word or phrase
Adj.1.bawdy - humorously vulgar; "bawdy songs"; "off-color jokes"; "ribald language"
dirty - (of behavior or especially language) characterized by obscenity or indecency; "dirty words"; "a dirty old man"; "dirty books and movies"; "boys telling dirty jokes"; "has a dirty mouth"

bawdy

bawdy

adjective
Offensive to accepted standards of decency:
Slang: raunchy.
Translations
فاحِش، فُجوري
oplzlý
fræksjofel
klæminn
nešvankusvulgarus
neķītrspiedauzīgsvulgārs

bawdy

[ˈbɔːdɪ] ADJ (bawdier (compar) (bawdiest (superl))) → subido de tono, verde, colorado (Mex)

bawdy

[ˈbɔːdi] adj [song] → grivois(e), paillard(e); [joke] → grivois(e)

bawdy

adj (+er)derb; bawdy talkderbes Gerede

bawdy

[ˈbɔːdɪ] adjpiccante, spinto/a, salace
bawdy song → canzonaccia

bawdy

(ˈboːdi) adjective
vulgar and coarse. bawdy jokes.
References in periodicals archive ?
He wasn't that enamoured when I did Celebrity Juice, I don't think he quite understood it, and he's not very on-board with the bawdier aspects of A League Of Their Own.
The Hamburg street art duo SUTOSUTO was behind the portrait, but the language of their images is normally a little bawdier than that.
Moreover, as Jaffe-Berg asserts, they "used performance as a site for sharing ideas and innovations that were otherwise restrictive"; as an example, she cites the mixing of the Petrarchan language and elevated love themes of the innamorati characters with Commedia's other, bawdier tropes (5).
In two lively and erudite essays, Charlotte Ribeyrol contextualizes Swinburne's sexually transgressive poetics: "It's Bawdier in Greek: A.
His rough style leaves them with half-finished faces and oddly proportioned limbs, stripping them of the womanly perfection and sensuousness associated with Renaissance portraiture or the bawdier, more earthy sexuality captured by modern artists such as Toulouse Lautrec.
Mrs Brown has changed somewhat since then, becoming bawdier and with a more widespread appeal.
(3) This bawdier and more frightening text--a wedding song with grotesque imagery--comes from Pushkin's own collection of folk songs gathered on or near his rural estates.
If anything, however, the show became even bawdier with the new cast, and there was no attempt to tone it down.
It's raw, sexy, and far bawdier than a typical "chick flick."
"It's very funny and a lot bawdier than many romantic comedies," Blunt says.
He simply did not want acceptance in the mainstream, which he assumed gay theater did; he wanted something bawdier in the theater than "la Coste shorts and pleats" or whatever uniform was in style for the respectable gay man (Ludlam 1992, 228).