beadle


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

bea·dle

 (bēd′l)
n.
A minor parish official formerly employed in an English church to usher and keep order during services.

[Middle English bedel, herald (from Old English bydel) and from Old French bedel (from Medieval Latin bedellus, from Old High German butil; see bheudh- in Indo-European roots).]

beadle

(ˈbiːdəl)
n
1. (Anglicanism) (formerly, in the Church of England) a minor parish official who acted as an usher and kept order
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) (in Scotland) a church official attending on the minister
3. (Judaism) Judaism a synagogue attendant. See also shammes
4. (Education) an official in certain British universities and other institutions
[Old English bydel; related to Old High German butil bailiff]
ˈbeadleship n

Beadle

(ˈbiːdəl)
n
(Biography) George Wells. 1903–89, US biologist, who shared the Nobel prize for physiology or medicine in 1958 for his work in genetics

bea•dle

(ˈbid l)

n.
1. a parish officer who performs various duties, as keeping order during the service.
[before 1000; Middle English bedel, dial. (SE) variant of bidel, Old English bydel apparitor, herald]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.beadle - a minor parish official who serves a ceremonial function
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
functionary, official - a worker who holds or is invested with an office
2.Beadle - United States biologist who discovered how hereditary characteristics are transmitted by genes (1903-1989)
Translations
dráb
kerkbaljuw

beadle

[ˈbiːdl] N
1. (Brit) (Univ) → bedel m
2. (Rel) → pertiguero m

beadle

n (old Eccl) → Kirchendiener m; (Univ) Angestellter, der bei Prozessionen den Amtsstab trägt
References in classic literature ?
Preceded by the beadle, and attended by an irregular procession of stern-browed men and unkindly visaged women, Hester Prynne set forth towards the place appointed for her punishment.
A pestilent conceit, which so often will insist upon obtruding even when beholding the mightiest royal beadle on his throne.
He suffered for this on several occasions; and particularly once, when Steerforth laughed in church, and the Beadle thought it was Traddles, and took him out.
Wopsle's hands, became Timon of Athens; the beadle, Coriolanus.
I say I will know how to behave, for once in my life I was beadle of a brotherhood, and the beadle's gown sat so well on me that all said I looked as if I was to be steward of the same brotherhood.
All the school- children, the singers and the firemen walked on the sidewalks, while in the middle of the street came first the custodian of the church with his halberd, then the beadle with a large cross, the teacher in charge of the boys and a sister escorting the little girls; three of the smallest ones, with curly heads, threw rose leaves into the air; the deacon with outstretched arms conducted the music; and two incense-bearers turned with each step they took toward the Holy Sacrament, which was carried by M.
This was so favourably received by the milkman and beadle that he would immediately have been pushed into the area if I had not held his pinafore while Richard and Mr.
Church, parson, clerk, beadle, glass-coach, bells, breakfast, bride-cake, favours, marrow-bones, cleavers, and all the rest of the tomfoolery.
the cashier tranquilly took out twenty-five clean bank-bills and pinned them together with a satisfied expression on his beadle face.
The priest was continually sending first the beadle and then the deacon to find out whether the bridegroom had not come, more and more often he went himself, in a lilac vestment and an embroidered sash, to the side door, expecting to see the bridegroom.
Here, a dozen squabbling urchins made a very Babel in the air; there, a solitary man, half clerk, half mendicant, paced up and down with hungry dejection in his look and gait; at his elbow passed an errand-lad, swinging his basket round and round, and with his shrill whistle riving the very timbers of the roof; while a more observant schoolboy, half-way through, pocketed his ball, and eyed the distant beadle as he came looming on.
Whenever I see a beadle in full fig, coming down a street on a Sunday at the head of a charity school, I am obliged to turn and run away, or I should hit him.