beadsman


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Related to beadsman: Beadswoman, bedesman

beadsman

(ˈbiːdzmən) or

bedesman

n, pl -men
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a person who prays for another's soul, esp one paid or fed for doing so
2. (Historical Terms) a person kept in an almshouse
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.beadsman - a person who is paid to pray for the soul of another
supplicant, prayer - someone who prays to God
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thom said: "The great thing about our products is they're for anyone, from the career beadsman to Mr Clean Shaven.
The beadsman (one who is paid to pray for others' sins) in the chapel represents someone who seeks truth without beauty.
Once again, I think the consistency of this historical vision with Wallace's work is clear--the identity crisis provides a vital thread through Wallace's work, from Lenore Beadsman's fear that she may not really exist, through to Fogle's early meandering or Meredith Rand who offers a long account of what she calls her "total identity crisis" (504), and often the concept of freedom is a vital factor in that crisis.
As I am a beadsman, I give serious thought to the state of your soul.
Agnes's beadsman. The beadsman's "frosted breath / Like pious incense" (6-7) creates a sonic effect comparable to what "whisp'ring" achieves in the Ode.
Although the Giaour is mysteriously generous towards the monastery, "Great largess to these walls he brought", the beadsman finds his presence there oppressive: "But were I Prior, not a day/ Should brook such stranger's further stay" (Selected 193).
Wittgenstein also features prominently in The Broom of the System, where an old woman in a nursing home, Leonore Beadsman, is said to have studied with the philosopher at Cambridge.
It was Hawley's second successive Derby victory (Beadsman won in 1858) and third in nine years.
The owl, for all his feathers was a-cold; The hare limped trembling through the frozen grass, /And silent was the flock in woolly fold: Numb'd were the Beadsman' fingers." (John Keats) (11) "God is light." (1 John 1:5) Keats's poem uses factors within our experience (being cold) as pointers to something outside our experience (a shepherd's experience on a winter night).
Later in the essay, Lamb describes himself as an "over-looked beadsman" whom the benefactors of the various Oxford colleges smile down on from their picture frames (2.9).
If ever danger do environ thee, Commend thy grievance to my holy prayers, For I will be thy beadsman, Valentine.
The Beads Onyx, plastic, pearl and gold The Beadsman a Thousand Aves told.