bear garden

(redirected from bear gardens)

bear garden

n
1. (Historical Terms) (formerly) a place where bears were exhibited and where bear-baiting took place
2. a place or scene of tumult and disorder
Translations

bear garden

n (fig) → manicomio
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References in classic literature ?
Never was a quiet and orderly household transformed so suddenly into a bear garden, or a happy man turned into such a completely miserable one.
Go Native Bear Gardens will open this spring in a converted warehouse on the location of former bear-baiting pit as an apartment stay lodging right on the Thames.
The Hope Playhouse, Animal Baiting and Later Industrial Activity at Bear Gardens on Bankside: Excavations at Riverside House and New Globe Walk, Southwark, 1999-2000.
The shorter of the two volumes, The Hope Playhouse, Animal Baiting and Later Industrial Activity at Bear Gardens on Bankside, is a detailed scholarly account of MOLA's 1999-2000 archaeological excavations at 27 Bear Wharf/ Riverside House and 20-22 New Globe Walk in Southwark, just east of the modern Shakespeare's Globe complex.
Director of London's Bear Gardens Museum (Shakespeare's Globe Theatre)
6) In the absence of the planned full reconstruction of Jones's design in the Globe building itself, of which only the shell has been completed, the Bear Gardens theatre is the Globe's closest analogue to the King's Men's Blackfriars theatre.
Not having the time or equipment to stage it safely in the Bear Gardens Theatre, coordinator James Wallace found an ingenious solution, adapting the scene so that Borgias climbed the rail at the front of the stage, then reeled backwards instead of forwards.
After discussing the Rose, the article will move on to look at work on the sites of the Globe, the Bear Gardens, the Boar's Head, the Hope, and the steps taken towards protecting the sites of London's other Tudor and Stuart playhouses.
During the course of the archaeological work (Mackinder & Blatherwick 2000), remains of medieval buildings fronting the Thames were recorded along with remains though to be associated with the Bear Gardens.
My interest in the four rolls owned by the British Library is somewhat different, however, for they do not mention playing companies or players but the widow of a playhouse owner, Agnes Henslowe, who was married to Philip Henslowe, best known because he owned the Rose and Fortune Playhouses and the Bear Garden (which eventually became the Hope).
23) And although there are no obvious references to Moss Alley in the sources with which we commonly associate Henslowe and his wife, in fact there was a Moss Alley located to the west of the sites of the Rose and the Bear Garden (later, the Hope Playhouse).