beastliness


Also found in: Thesaurus.

beast·ly

 (bēst′lē)
adj. beast·li·er, beast·li·est
1. Of or resembling a beast; bestial.
2. Very disagreeable; unpleasant.
adv. Chiefly British
To an extreme degree; very.

beast′li·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.beastliness - the quality of being deliberately meanbeastliness - the quality of being deliberately mean
malevolency, malice, malevolence - the quality of threatening evil
2.beastliness - unpleasant nastinessbeastliness - unpleasant nastiness; used especially of nasty weather
nastiness - the quality of being unpleasant; "I flinched at the nastiness of his wound"
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Translations
فَظاظَه، وَحْشِيَّه
bestialitasprostotazvířeckost
væmmelighed
brutalitás
kvikindisháttur
beštialita
hayvanlıkiğrençlik

beastliness

[ˈbiːstlɪnɪs] Nbestialidad f

beastliness

n (inf)Scheußlichkeit f, → Garstigkeit f; (of person, conduct also)Gemeinheit f, → Ekligkeit f (inf)

beast

(biːst)
1. a four-footed (especially large) animal. beasts of the jungle.
2. a cruel, brutal person.
3. an unpleasant person. Arthur is a beast for refusing to come!
ˈbeastly adjective
1. like a beast.
2. disagreeable. What a beastly thing to do!
ˈbeastliness noun
References in classic literature ?
But if I find them giving themselves airs, or monopolizing my father, or at all ill-treating him, or worrying him with their artistic beastliness, I intend to put my foot down, yes, firmly.
Fielding and Smollett could portray the beastliness of their day in the beastliest language; we have plenty of foul subjects to deal with in our day, but we are not allowed to approach them very near, even with nice and guarded forms of speech.
Oh, the beastliness! And it isn't the beastliness of it that matters most!
Now he was seized with a desire to do horrible, sordid things; he wanted to roll himself in gutters; his whole being yearned for beastliness; he wanted to grovel.
And this far for the cruelty committed, to give occasion unto others, and to such as hate the monstrous dealing of degenerate nobility, to look more diligently upon their behaviuours, and to paint them forth unto the world, that they themselves may be ashamed of their own beastliness, and that the world may be advertised and admonished to abhor, detest, and avoid the company of all sic tyrants, who are not worthy of the society of men, but ought to be sent suddenly to the devil, with whom they must burn without end, for their contempt of God, and cruelty committed against his creatures.
And not only did Borckman sense it, but it served as a spur to drive him back into primitive beastliness, and to fight to master this puppy as a primitive man, under dissimilar provocation, might have fought with the members of the first litter stolen from a wolf-den among the rocks.
"But you, who have opened the books and who share my awful confidence--you know him for what he is, brother to you and the dust, a cosmic joke, a sport of chemistry, a garmented beast that arose out of the ruck of screaming beastliness by virtue and accident of two opposable great toes.
The desires for the good grub and soft beds ashore which a handsome pay-day brings them--the women and the drink, the gorging and the beastliness which so truly expresses them, the best that is in them, their highest aspirations, their ideals, if you please.
All life had turned to rottenness and stench in them--love was a beastliness, joy was a snare, and God was an imprecation.
Where is the daughter who had pity upon the filthy drunkard, her earthly father, undismayed by his beastliness?' And He will say, 'Come to me!
"All these texts," observes Reid-Pharr, "demonstrate Delany's interest in what one might call the beastliness of human sexuality, the ways that our sexual desires and practices represent not only our need for affection and companionship but also an unquenchable fascination with violence and degradation" (129).
The selection of essays in the second part reflects the editor's particular interest in "radical evil." Kontos himself compares the radical or extreme evils identified by Aristotle in human individuals and communities respectively: beastliness (theriotes;) in the one, complete breakdown of the rule of law in the other.