Beat Generation


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Beat Generation

n.
A group of American writers and artists popular in the 1950s and early 1960s, influenced by Eastern philosophy and religion and known especially for their use of nontraditional forms and their rejection of conventional social values.

[From beat, weary (coined by Jack Kerouac in 1948 to describe the disaffected underground urban youth culture of the time, but later associated with beat, rhythmic pulse beatitude).]

Beat Generation

n (functioning as singular or plural)
1. (Sociology) members of the generation that came to maturity in the 1950s, whose rejection of the social and political systems of the West was expressed through contempt for regular work, possessions, traditional dress, etc, and espousal of anarchism, communal living, drugs, etc
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Movements) a group of US writers, notably Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and William Burroughs, who emerged in the 1950s

Beat′ Genera′tion


n.
(often l.c.) members of the generation that came of age in the 1950s and espoused forms of mysticism and the relaxation of social inhibitions.
[1950–55; appar. beat, adj.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Beat Generation - a United States youth subculture of the 1950sbeat generation - a United States youth subculture of the 1950s; rejected possessions or regular work or traditional dress; for communal living and psychedelic drugs and anarchism; favored modern forms of jazz (e.g., bebop)
youth subculture - a minority youth culture whose distinctiveness depended largely on the social class and ethnic background of its members; often characterized by its adoption of a particular music genre
beatnik, beat - a member of the beat generation; a nonconformist in dress and behavior
References in periodicals archive ?
This, I thought, was the way of the future and I would write a novel or book of poetry that didn't have to rhyme (I was also a fan of Alan Ginsberg) and join the literati of the Beat Generation. Instead I became a journalist and grammatical discipline was once more enforced.
Their topics include in Kainuu as in Colorado: receptions and appropriations of Beat literature in Finland during the 1960s, Howl on the road: traces of the Beat movement in Estonian literature, from pencil blue to carnation red: the long 1960s and Beat reception in Portugal, the Beat generation in Spain: changes in the underground culture, reading Beat and being Beat in Oslo: the reception and inspiration of Beat culture in post-war Norway, and unexploded bombshells: Beat (non)subversion in the Francophone and Flemish crucibles.
The artists and other Beat Generation figures represented here are core to the movement or are associated with then-contemporary and complementary avant-garde poetic movements.
In a recent article for the Washington Post, Jeff Weiss describes traveling the West Coast of America, interviewing surviving members of the Beat Generation (Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Diane di Prima, Michael McClure, Herbert Gold, and Gary Snyder).
We were known as the Beat Generation, famous for taking trips, Mostly by chara to Blackpool, when the pubs shut, we loved our fish and chips.
The Beat Generation's definition of "square" is in Webster's 1986 dictionary as the 16th noun definition: "a person who is an outsider or adversary because of the conventionality, conservatism, or respectability of his taste, behavior, or way of life: one who is not in the know: fogy, also: dupe, sucker - compare bourgeois, philistine."
Brett heads to Paris, living in fleabag hotels and befriending some of the Beat Generation writers, including Allen Ginsberg.
"Beat Generation" will not entirely depart from our posthumanist Zeitgeist.
Iain Sinclair sets out on his quest for the ghosts and spirits of members of the Beat Generation because "I needed a new mythology to shield against the sense of loss and hanging dread inherent in the invasion and dissolution of my familiar London ground." He ranges across America from ocean to ocean, from Charles Olson to Gary Snyder and down the list of marginal figures who have become "living exhibits," discovering in the process that poets have been "absorbed by the fetishized objects that surround them." Those who cannot create "a successful brand" and in effect issue an IPO can only fall back on "erasure, suicide, Mexico."
Part of a series of pop culture "FAQ" titles from Backbeat Books, The Beat Generation FAQ: All That's Left To Know About The Angleheaded Hipsters examines a literary movement that arose as counterculture to the stifling repressions and conformity that saturated post World War II life in the United States.
Out of the chaos and destruction of World War II emerged the hipster, a figure variously represented in works such as John Clellon Holmes', Go, which is about the group of figures at the center of the Beat Generation: Lawrence Lipton's The Holy Barbarians, a sociological study of the lives of some West Coast hipsters; and Norman Mailer's essay "The White Negro" (1957), in which he introduced his titular existential anti-hero.