beaver

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bea·ver 1

 (bē′vər)
n.
1.
a. Either of two large semiaquatic rodents, Castor canadensis of North America or C. fiber of Eurasia, having thick brown fur, webbed hind feet, a broad flat tail, and sharp incisors used for gnawing bark and felling trees, with which they construct dams and underwater lodges.
b. The fur of a beaver.
c. A top hat originally made of the underfur of a beaver.
2. A napped wool fabric, similar to felt, used for outer garments.
3.
a. Vulgar Slang The female genitals.
b. Offensive Slang A woman or girl.
adj.
1. Of or relating to a beaver or beavers: beaver fur; a beaver hat.
2. Constructed by beavers: beaver dams.
intr.v. bea·vered, bea·ver·ing, bea·vers
To work diligently and energetically.

[Middle English bever, from Old English beofor; see bher- in Indo-European roots.]

bea·ver 2

or be·vor  (bē′vər)
n.
1. A piece of armor attached to a helmet or breastplate to protect the throat or lower face.
2. The visor on a helmet.

[Middle English bavier, from Old French baviere, child's bib, beaver, from bave, saliva.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

beaver

(ˈbiːvə)
n
1. (Animals) a large amphibious rodent, Castor fiber, of Europe, Asia, and North America: family Castoridae. It has soft brown fur, a broad flat hairless tail, and webbed hind feet, and constructs complex dams and houses (lodges) in rivers
2. (Textiles) the fur of this animal
3. (Animals) mountain beaver a burrowing rodent, Aplodontia rufa, of W North America: family Aplodontidae
4. (Clothing & Fashion) a tall hat of beaver fur or a fabric resembling it, worn, esp by men, during the 19th century
5. (Textiles) a woollen napped cloth resembling beaver fur, formerly much used for overcoats, etc
6. (Colours) a greyish- or yellowish-brown colour
7. obsolete a full beard
8. a bearded man
9. (modifier) having the colour of beaver or made of beaver fur or some similar material: a beaver lamb coat; a beaver stole.
vb
(usually foll by: away) to work industriously or steadily
[Old English beofor; compare Old Norse biōrr, Old High German bibar, Latin fiber, Sanskrit babhrú red-brown]

beaver

(ˈbiːvə)
n
(Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) a movable piece on a medieval helmet used to protect the lower part of the face
[C15: from Old French baviere, from baver to dribble]

Beaver

(ˈbiːvə)
n
a member of a Beaver Colony, the youngest group of boys (aged 6–8 years) in the Scout Association
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bea•ver1

(ˈbi vər)

n., pl. -vers, (esp. collectively) -ver for 1.
1. a large amphibious rodent of the genus Castor, having sharp incisors, webbed hind feet, and a flattened tail, noted for its ability to dam streams with trees, branches, etc.
2. the fur of this animal.
3. a hat made of beaver fur or an imitation of it.
5. Informal. an exceptionally active or hardworking person.
6.
a. a thickly napped cotton cloth used chiefly for work clothes.
b. (formerly) a thickly napped woolen cloth made to resemble beaver fur.
[before 1000; Middle English bever, Old English be(o)for, c. Old High German bibar, Old Norse bjōrr, Lithuanian bebrùs, Latin fiber]

bea•ver2

(ˈbi vər)

n.
1. plate armor covering the lower part of the face and the throat.
2. a visor for a helmet.
[1400–50; alter. of late Middle English bavier, bavour < Middle French baviere (Old French: bib)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

bea·ver

(bē′vər)
A large aquatic rodent having thick brown fur, webbed hind feet, and a broad flat tail. Beavers feed on bark and twigs. They have sharp front teeth adapted for gnawing and cutting down trees, which they use in constructing dams and lodges with underwater exits.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

beaver


Past participle: beavered
Gerund: beavering

Imperative
beaver
beaver
Present
I beaver
you beaver
he/she/it beavers
we beaver
you beaver
they beaver
Preterite
I beavered
you beavered
he/she/it beavered
we beavered
you beavered
they beavered
Present Continuous
I am beavering
you are beavering
he/she/it is beavering
we are beavering
you are beavering
they are beavering
Present Perfect
I have beavered
you have beavered
he/she/it has beavered
we have beavered
you have beavered
they have beavered
Past Continuous
I was beavering
you were beavering
he/she/it was beavering
we were beavering
you were beavering
they were beavering
Past Perfect
I had beavered
you had beavered
he/she/it had beavered
we had beavered
you had beavered
they had beavered
Future
I will beaver
you will beaver
he/she/it will beaver
we will beaver
you will beaver
they will beaver
Future Perfect
I will have beavered
you will have beavered
he/she/it will have beavered
we will have beavered
you will have beavered
they will have beavered
Future Continuous
I will be beavering
you will be beavering
he/she/it will be beavering
we will be beavering
you will be beavering
they will be beavering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been beavering
you have been beavering
he/she/it has been beavering
we have been beavering
you have been beavering
they have been beavering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been beavering
you will have been beavering
he/she/it will have been beavering
we will have been beavering
you will have been beavering
they will have been beavering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been beavering
you had been beavering
he/she/it had been beavering
we had been beavering
you had been beavering
they had been beavering
Conditional
I would beaver
you would beaver
he/she/it would beaver
we would beaver
you would beaver
they would beaver
Past Conditional
I would have beavered
you would have beavered
he/she/it would have beavered
we would have beavered
you would have beavered
they would have beavered
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.beaver - the soft brown fur of the beaverbeaver - the soft brown fur of the beaver  
fur, pelt - the dressed hairy coat of a mammal
2.beaver - a native or resident of OregonBeaver - a native or resident of Oregon  
American - a native or inhabitant of the United States
3.beaver - a full beardbeaver - a full beard        
beard, face fungus, whiskers - the hair growing on the lower part of a man's face
4.beaver - a man's hat with a tall crownbeaver - a man's hat with a tall crown; usually covered with silk or with beaver fur
chapeau, hat, lid - headdress that protects the head from bad weather; has shaped crown and usually a brim
man's clothing - clothing that is designed for men to wear
5.beaver - a movable piece of armor on a medieval helmet used to protect the lower facebeaver - a movable piece of armor on a medieval helmet used to protect the lower face
armor plate, armor plating, armour plate, plate armor, plate armour - specially hardened steel plate used to protect fortifications or vehicles from enemy fire
helmet - a protective headgear made of hard material to resist blows
6.beaver - a hat made with the fur of a beaver (or similar material)
fur hat - a hat made of fur
7.beaver - large semiaquatic rodent with webbed hind feet and a broad flat tailbeaver - large semiaquatic rodent with webbed hind feet and a broad flat tail; construct complex dams and underwater lodges
gnawer, rodent - relatively small placental mammals having a single pair of constantly growing incisor teeth specialized for gnawing
genus Castor, Castor - type genus of the Castoridae: beavers
Castor fiber, Old World beaver - a European variety of beaver
Castor canadensis, New World beaver - a variety of beaver found in almost all areas of North America except Florida
Verb1.beaver - work hard on somethingbeaver - work hard on something    
work - exert oneself by doing mental or physical work for a purpose or out of necessity; "I will work hard to improve my grades"; "she worked hard for better living conditions for the poor"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

beaver

verb
beaver away work, sweat, slave, persist, graft (informal), toil, slog (away), persevere, plug away (informal), drudge, hammer away, peg away, exert yourself, break your back, keep your nose to the grindstone They are beavering away to get everything ready for us.
Related words
habitation lodge
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
فَرْو القُنْدُسقُنْدُسقندُس
бобър
bobrbobří kožešina
bæverbæverskind
majava
dabar
hódhódprém
bifurbifurskinn
ビーバー
비버
bebrasbebro kailis
bebrādabebrs
castor
boborbobria kožušina
bober
bäver
สัตว์ครึ่งบกครึ่งน้ำคล้ายนาก
kunduzkunduz derisikastor
бобер
con hải ly

beaver

[ˈbiːvəʳ] N
1.castor m
2. (esp US) → coño m
beaver away VI + ADVtrabajar con empeño
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

beaver

[ˈbiːvər] n (= animal) → castor m
beaver away
vi (= work hard) → travailler d'arrache-pied
to beaver away to get sth done → travailler d'arrache-pied pour finir qch
to beaver away at sth → travailler d'arrache-pied à qch
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

beaver

1
n
Biber m; to work like a beaverwie ein Wilder/eine Wilde arbeiten ? eager beaver
(= fur)Biber(pelz) m
(= hat)Biber- or Kastorhut m

beaver

2
n (of helmet)Kinnreff nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

beaver

[ˈbiːvəʳ] ncastoro
beaver away vi + advlavorare di buona lena
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

beaver

(ˈbiːvə) noun
1. an animal with strong front teeth, noted for its skill in damming streams.
2. its fur.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

beaver

قُنْدُس bobr bæver Biber κάστορας castor majava castor dabar castoro ビーバー 비버 bever bever bóbr castor бобр bäver สัตว์ครึ่งบกครึ่งน้ำคล้ายนาก kunduz con hải ly 海狸
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
He came as a Butcher: but gravely declared, When the ship had been sailing a week, He could only kill Beavers. The Bellman looked scared, And was almost too frightened to speak:
There was also a Beaver, that paced on the deck, Or would sit making lace in the bow: And had often (the Bellman said) saved them from wreck, Though none of the sailors knew how.
A few beavers were taken every night, and salmon trout of a small size, so that the camp had principally to subsist upon dried buffalo meat.
Food was given to both; they skulked about the camp like hungry hounds, seeking what they might devour, and having gathered up the feet and entrails of some beavers that were lying about, slunk off with them to their den among the rocks.
Instead of taking the path which led directly toward the camp of the Delawares, Magua led his party for some distance down the windings of the stream, and along the little artificial lake of the beavers. The day began to dawn as they entered the clearing which had been formed by those sagacious and industrious animals.
He painted the quality as forming the great point of difference between the beaver and other brutes; between the brutes and men; and, finally, between the Hurons, in particular, and the rest of the human race.
I shall have a hard time after them very beavers, for this fine.
Them beavers must be had, and I and the pups be getting old; we want the best of ammunition.”
"It is a year, Grey Beaver, since she ran away," spoke a second Indian.
"It is not strange, Salmon Tongue," Grey Beaver answered.
In the course of his journey Captain Bonneville had occasion to remark an instance of the many notions, and almost superstitions, which prevail among the Indians, and among some of the white men, with respect to the sagacity of the beaver. The Indian hunters of his party were in the habit of exploring all the streams along which they passed, in search of "beaver lodges," and occasionally set their traps with some success.
The abundance of musk-rats in the swamp was but an earnest of the nobler game they were to find when they should reach the Malade River, and have a capital beaver country all to themselves, where they might trap at their leisure without molestation.