bebop


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be·bop

 (bē′bŏp′)
n. Music
Bop.

[Imitation of a two-note phrase in this music.]

be′bop′per n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bebop

(ˈbiːbɒp)
n
(Pop Music) the full name for bop11
[C20: imitative of the rhythm of the music]
ˈbebopper n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bop1

(bɒp)

n., v. bopped, bop•ping. n.
1. Also called bebop. jazz marked by often dissonant harmony, fast tempos, eccentric rhythms, and melodic intricacy.
v.i.
2. to dance or move to bop music.
3. Slang. to move, go, or proceed.
[1945–50, Amer.]

bop2

(bɒp)

v. bopped, bop•ping,
n. Slang. v.t.
1. to strike, as with the fist or a stick; hit.
n.
2. a blow.
[1935–40; alter. of bob3]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

bebop

A form of jazz invented by black jazz artists in the United States in the 1940s who were determined to break free from the constraints of the big dance bands. Small groups of musicians were typical, playing at fast tempos, often extemporizing, and displaying great instrumental virtuosity. Also known as bop or rebop.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bebop - an early form of modern jazz (originating around 1940)bebop - an early form of modern jazz (originating around 1940)
jazz - a genre of popular music that originated in New Orleans around 1900 and developed through increasingly complex styles
Verb1.bebop - dance the bebopbebop - dance the bebop      
trip the light fantastic, trip the light fantastic toe, dance - move in a pattern; usually to musical accompaniment; do or perform a dance; "My husband and I like to dance at home to the radio"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

bebop

[ˈbiːbɒp] Nbebop m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

bebop

[ˈbiːbɒp] nbebop m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
They can no longer be construed as bebop revisited or fake anything, but are a remarkable, large jazz ensemble playing Lurie's compositions, which echo Africa, klezmer, Blue Note, Barry White, and Unified Field Theory.)
In the 1940s, when American society was transformed by World War II, jazz music evolved into a more complicated form known as bebop. On Broadway, jazz dance that was derived from social styles vanished with the emerging popularity of ballet and modern dance.
Fred was named after the founder of bebop Thelonious Monk by his jazz guitarist father.
And as crowd favourite and number one hit single Grace Kelly screeched across the venue, Mika teased the fans with a series of searing bebop challenges.
Jenkins' analysis of Mingus' complete recordings is appropriate for a general audience and is framed by the major events in Mingus' career, including: his childhood fixation with Duke Ellington, early work with the bebop masters, the recording of his influential Ah Um, and the Columbia Records censorship of his lyrics attacking segregationist Arkansas governor Orville Faubus.
Alto saxophonist Phil Woods, by contrast, has stayed quite consistently true to his bebop roots, and remains one of the most consistently enjoyable mainstream jazz musicians on the current scene.
A BAND led by drummer Tim Ward has the revival of bebop as its raison d'etre.
Ella's star shines brighter when she sings with the swingin' Chick Web Orchestra, then scats with Duke Ellington's bebop band.
Glen is probably the most authentic bebop altoist in South Wales.
Tolson's intellectually rigorous verse, always tending toward the extended sequence, is as unnerving as 1940s bebop, itself a determinedly ambitious statement that celebrates the wide-ranging authority and assimilative prowess of the black American.
Synopsis: "A Jazzman's Tale" by Annette Johnson is a screenplay memoir of bebop trumpeter and pianist Charles Freeman Lee.