bedlam


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bed·lam

 (bĕd′ləm)
n.
1. A place or situation of noisy uproar and confusion.
2. often Bedlam Archaic An insane asylum.

[Middle English Bedlem, Hospital of Saint Mary of Bethlehem, an institution in London for the mentally ill .]

bedlam

(ˈbɛdləm)
n
1. a noisy confused place or situation; state of uproar: his speech caused bedlam.
2. (Psychiatry) archaic a lunatic asylum; madhouse
[C13 bedlem, bethlem, after the Hospital of St Mary of Bethlehem in London]

bed•lam

(ˈbɛd ləm)

n.
1. a scene or state of wild uproar and confusion.
2. Archaic. an insane asylum or madhouse.
[after Bedlam, a familiar name for the Hospital of St. Mary of Bethlehem in London, a lunatic asylum from c1400]

bedlam

- The word bedlam is a contraction of Bethlehem, a hospital in London that became a lunatic asylum.
See also related terms for hospital.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bedlam - a state of extreme confusion and disorderbedlam - a state of extreme confusion and disorder
confusion - disorder resulting from a failure to behave predictably; "the army retreated in confusion"
balagan - a word for chaos or fiasco borrowed from modern Hebrew (where it is a loan word from Russian); "it was utter and complete balagan!"
2.bedlam - pejorative terms for an insane asylumBedlam - pejorative terms for an insane asylum
mental home, mental hospital, mental institution, psychiatric hospital, insane asylum, asylum, institution - a hospital for mentally incompetent or unbalanced person

bedlam

noun pandemonium, noise, confusion, chaos, turmoil, clamour, furore, uproar, commotion, rumpus, babel, tumult, hubbub, ruction (informal), hullabaloo, hue and cry, ruckus (informal) He is causing bedlam at the hotel.
Translations
blázinec
kaospostyrvirvar
tébolyda
hávaîi
beprotnamis
juceklistrakomāja

bedlam

[ˈbedləm] N
1. (= uproar) → alboroto m
it was sheer bedlamla confusión era total
bedlam broke outse armó la de San Quintín
2. (Hist) (= asylum) → manicomio m

bedlam

[ˈbɛdləm] n (= noise) → chahut m (= chaos) → cirque m
It's bedlam in here! → Quel cirque là-dedans! bed linen nlinge m de lit

bedlam

n (fig: = uproar) → Chaos nt; in the classroom it was absolute bedlamin der Klasse ging es zu wie im Irrenhaus

bedlam

[ˈbɛdləm] nbaraonda

bedlam

(ˈbedləm) noun
(a place of) noise, confusion or uproar. Their house is bedlam.
References in periodicals archive ?
Loosely connected to the world of her bestselling The Watchmaker of Filigree Street, The Bedlam Stacks is a lyrical paean to the power of transformation, faith and friendship.
In half a century of being round the political scene, I've never seen bedlam like this.
There is significantly less real history in the sequel, except for locations such as Bedlam, but the dinosaur battles are terrific and should appeal to teen readers with a penchant for action and suspense.
For the poor, there was no choice but Bedlam, and even for that they had to thank the charity of Crusader knight Simon Fitzmary.
Beehive Bedlam Reactors is based on the Beehive Bedlam social game, which was one of the most renowned offerings through the Sky Games interactive TV platform for over 10 years.
It is thought that 30,000 Londoners were buried in the Bedlam burial ground between 1569 and 1738, though only a few from the nearby Bethlehem Hospital for the mentally ill, also known as Bedlam.
Public generosity towards Bedlam Beggars led to a brisk trade in counterfeit armbands.
The Record revealed how last week's Bedlam Promotions Cup final was abandoned with Inverkeithing winning 2-1, when Denbeath player Craig Craigie was struck by a beer bottle from the terraces.
Queen of Bedlam is a story of lost love and a life dominated by duty, based on the tragic life of Queen Charlotte, wife of 'mad' King George III of England.
Archaeologists speculate that the skulls are a part of the 3,000 skeletons that are believed to lie buried in the Bedlam burial ground and are probably of those whose heads were decapitated by Queen Boudicca's rebels in the 1st Century AD during the uprising against Roman occupation.
It's cruel to watch these deluded people" Actor Nicholas Lyndhurst, of Only Fools And Horses fame, saying that watching Britain's Got Talent is like gawping at Bedlam asylum patients
It's cruel to watch these deluded people" - Actor Nicholas Lyndhurst believes watching Britain's Got Talent is like gawping at Bedlam asylum patients.