bee gum

bee gum

n. Chiefly Southern US
1. A beehive located in a hollow tree or log.
2. Any beehive.

[bee + gum, a hollowed-out log (from gum).]
References in periodicals archive ?
Aaron Adams, who gave a glimpse of a fascinating project at Bee Gum Preserve on the Indian River Lagoon to increase the productivity of tarpon and snook habitat at an old mosquito ditch compound.
Growing up, he tended several honeybee hives on his father's farm, including a log "bee gum" which regularly generated swarms to be caught.
The hollow tree was called a bee gum, and the bees would prosper and produce honey for our family.
Bees also take into the hive resin, mix it with wax and other secretions to make propolis, or "bee gum".
Consider the amazing Success of the unassuming Bee Gum Reserve habitat in Indian River County.
Part of what makes the waters in Bee Gum and other marshy, mangrove lined channels so attractive to young gamefish are the low oxygen levels-which prevent bigger, predatorial fish from hunting there and allow the young ones to safely grow.
Adams at Bonefish & Tarpon Trust and Shenkerat Florida Institute of Technology had some ideas on how to measure the productivity of those nursery habitats, improve them and--importantly--verify those improvements so that the Bee Gum project might be used as a model for similar mosquito control impoundments around the state.
"We were able to use information from snook and tarpon in Charlotte Harbor and apply it here, where with our team, we experimentally revised how the water management here at Bee Gum could be changed to improve the nursery habitat.
We all know that fish depend on healthy habitat and if we can work with the state to increase the value of habitats like Bee Gum and other impoundments to make them more valuable, that's going to help them manage the fisheries.
Caption: Aerial of the maze of Bee Gum Reserve, productive gamefish nursery habitat.