beefwood


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beef·wood

 (bēf′wo͝od′)
n.
Any of various Australian trees or shrubs having dense red timber, including several casuarinas.

beefwood

(ˈbiːfˌwʊd)
n
1. (Plants) any of various trees that produce very hard wood, esp the Australian tree Casuarina equisetifolia, widely planted in warm regions. See casuarina
2. (Plants) the wood of any of these trees
[from the red colour and grain]

beef•wood

(ˈbifˌwʊd)

n.
1. any of several chiefly Australian trees of the genus Casuarina, having feathery branches that lack true foliage leaves.
2. the hard, reddish wood of any of these trees, used for making furniture.
[1830–40; so called from its beeflike color]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.beefwood - a tropical hardwood tree yielding balata gum and heavy red timberbeefwood - a tropical hardwood tree yielding balata gum and heavy red timber
balata, gutta balata - when dried yields a hard substance used e.g. in golf balls
tree - a tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms
2.beefwood - any of several heavy hard reddish chiefly tropical woods of the families Casuarinaceae and Proteaceae; some used for cabinetwork
Grevillea striata, beefwood - tree yielding hard heavy reddish wood
scrub beefwood, Stenocarpus salignus, beefwood - tree or tall shrub with shiny leaves and umbels of fragrant creamy-white flowers; yields hard heavy reddish wood
beefwood - any of several Australian trees of the genus Casuarina yielding heavy hard red wood used in cabinetwork
wood - the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
3.beefwood - any of several Australian trees of the genus Casuarina yielding heavy hard red wood used in cabinetwork
genus Casuarina - genus of trees and shrubs widely naturalized in southern United States and West Indies; coextensive with the family Casuarinaceae and order Casuarinales
casuarina - any of various trees and shrubs of the genus Casuarina having jointed stems and whorls of scalelike leaves; some yield heavy hardwood
Australian pine, Casuarina equisetfolia - common Australian tree widely grown as an ornamental in tropical regions; yields heavy hard red wood
beefwood - any of several heavy hard reddish chiefly tropical woods of the families Casuarinaceae and Proteaceae; some used for cabinetwork
4.beefwood - tree or tall shrub with shiny leaves and umbels of fragrant creamy-white flowers; yields hard heavy reddish wood
genus Stenocarpus, Stenocarpus - small genus of timber trees; Australia to Malaysia
beefwood - any of several heavy hard reddish chiefly tropical woods of the families Casuarinaceae and Proteaceae; some used for cabinetwork
tree - a tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms
5.beefwood - tree yielding hard heavy reddish wood
silk oak - any of several Australian timber trees having usually fernlike foliage and mottled wood used in cabinetry and veneering
beefwood - any of several heavy hard reddish chiefly tropical woods of the families Casuarinaceae and Proteaceae; some used for cabinetwork
References in periodicals archive ?
The scope uses an eclectic mix of spalted curly maple, walnut, western pine, beefwood, curly Australian eucalyptus, African bubinga, bloodwood, and various exotic burlwoods.
farinae), cat, dog, feather, insect mix (American and German cockroaches and fire ants), mosquito (Aedes taeniorhynchus), mixed grass (Bermuda, Johnson, Bahia, Salt, and Rye), tree (mix 1: Mulberry, Elm, Acacia, Cypress; mix 2: box elder, beefwood, bayberry, oak, palm, melaleuca, hackberry, sweet gum, and maple), interior and exterior mold (Rhizopus, Mucor, Pullularia, Penicillum, Aspergillus, Curvularia, Fusarium, Alternaria, Hormodendrum, Helmintospororium), and weed (mix 1: English Plantain, Pigweed, Ragweed; mix 2: marsh elder, cocklebur, lamb quarter); in addition, a histamine skin test was performed and a diluent control was included for each series.
Another Aboriginal treatment from the Murray River region consisted of applying a poultice made with hot ashes to the envenomated limb, (54) while in the Brewarrina district of north-western New South Wales white gum produced at certain times of the year by the Beefwood tree (Grevillea striata) was ingested as a remedy for snakebite.