beeyard

beeyard

(ˈbiːˌjɑːd)
n
another name for apiary
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1851 as he was returning home from his beeyard he thought about what he had observed in his colonies, that when left to their own devices the bees maintain an even spacing between the combs, about 3/8ths of an inch, what I think of as the space required for two bees to work comfortably back to back on adjacent combs.
Recently we had a big surprise at our island farm when our friend Stephen Roquet came by with three farmhands ready to mow overgrown grass in the beeyard portion of our eight-hectare (20-acre) veggie farm.
A second Florida beeyard was used to study the spatial distribution of trap catch, and to determine the effect of shade and distance from bee colonies on numbers captured.
Its attractiveness was tested by trapping at 2 beeyards in north-central Florida and 7 in Pennsylvania, all with previous histories of SHB infestation.
Three groups of 6 baited and 6 control traps were placed in one of the Florida beeyards.
Seven beeyards in Pennsylvania, each in a different county, were used to compare baited and control traps.
By 1981 Bob had almost two hundred hives in beeyards around the Finger Lakes, and many farmers depended on him for the pollination of their orchards.
Bob and I would head out at seven in the morning in a red pickup, eating apples from his family's orchard as we drove along, down the sweeping farm roads around the lakes, down roads of matted grass that ran alongside autumn fields, and into brush clearings of sumac and elder where his beeyards were hidden away.