begrudgery

begrudgery

(bɪˈɡrʌdʒərɪ)
n
(Sociology) informal Irish resentment of any person who has achieved success or wealth
References in periodicals archive ?
And they'll put it down to typical begrudgery from the likes of Kerry, Mayo, Donegal, Tyrone and the rest of the Rebel Alliance.
And the atmosphere of profound respect for the Second World War generation, and for the legacy they left us, adds an added twist of irony to the fact that here in Edinburgh, the annual festival season - built around the city's historic decision, back in 1947, to become the host of a great international festival that would help heal the wounds of a divided Europe and a divided world - is approaching not in a mood of joyful and grateful celebration, but amid the usual roars of complaint and begrudgery.
WHAT develops first in amateur gardeners - green fingers or begrudgery? Spring's first demure daffodil or peeping primrose this year has brought Genus Brummiensis rebelling at that perfectly reasonable PS35 green waste tax and its spin-offs for non-payers.
Was MacBride the victim of small-minded critics, merely a prophet without honor in a native land known for its begrudgery? Or were his charms best appreciated from a distance, driven by a self-righteousness and opportunism that was more easily disguised amidst the world-class egos of the international stage?
"I'm convinced that part of the reason why I was not a hit in Ireland was due to begrudgery," he said.
After speculating on the causes of this "anti-Americanism"--"begrudgery," "misinformation," and "Irish myths of national self-identity"--he presents cases that he feels better represent US foreign policy and diplomacy, all of which he has been involved in over different parts of his career.
I feel no begrudgery against the man who stopped me.'
This opprobrious identification often remained decades after their return to Ireland, as insinuations of failure in America often combined with the begrudgery of the initially spurned native society to deny full reacceptance into Irish society.
It is at best what the Irish call begrudgery, the need to pull down anything that is bigger than we are for the sake of our own sense of righteousness.
The Wagon Wheel singer told how he is used to being "scrutinised", adding: "There's probably even more begrudgery in the music business than in every other line of work."