behavioral genetics


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behavioral genetics

n.
The study of the genetic underpinnings of behavioral phenotypes such as eating or mating activity, substance abuse, social attitudes, violence, and mental abilities.
References in periodicals archive ?
Human behavioral genetics use family, adoption and twins studies to estimate the importance of genes and environment to individual development.
Among specific topics are the behavioral genetics of human pair bonding, motivational aspects of future thinking in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, neural correlates of the competitive emotions envy and schadenfreude, extrinsic effects and models of dominance hierarchy formation, and insights from evolutionary game theory into complex social cognition and the appreciation of social norms in psychiatric disorders.
In addition, evidence from behavioral genetics studies suggests that PTSD, like other anxiety and mood disorders, arises from a combination of non-disorder-specific genetic and environmental factors, he noted.
Special features of the text include chapter links, focus sections on critical thinking and research methods, and a behavioral genetics appendix.
Two experiences clarified for me precisely how worried people can get about the legal implications of behavioral genetics. First, I attended the 1994 conference on genes and crime, (1) at which interrupting protestors famously chanted, "Maryland conference, you can't hide; we know you're pushing genocide." Two signs illustrated their concerns.
I returned not long ago from a meeting of the Society of Christian and Jewish Ethics in Miami, where I spoke at a workshop on the social and ethical implications of behavioral genetics research.
David Reiss, a renowned family and behavioral genetics researcher, and his esteemed colleagues.
At the Institute for Behavioral Genetics, the children completed an extensive battery of psychometric tests that included the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R; Wechsler, 1974) or the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R; Wechsler, 1981).
Boardman is a sociologist who spent five years studying genetics at CU-Boulder's Institute for Behavioral Genetics to bring insights of the social sciences to the natural sciences.
The book offers a parent's guide to behavioral genetics, with several chapters devoted to explaining current research in the field and its implications for parenting.
Wrestling with behavioral genetics; science, ethics, and public conversation.
As the poet Mark Strand said, "The future is always beginning now." (1) When considering the social impact that neuroscience and behavioral genetics will have on the criminal justice system, scientists, lawyers, courts, and policymakers might do well to keep Strand's words in mind.
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