behavioral science


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behavioral science

n.
A scientific discipline, such as sociology, anthropology, or psychology, in which the actions and reactions of humans and animals are studied through observational and experimental methods.

behavioral scientist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

behav′ioral sci′ence


n.
a science or branch of learning, as psychology or sociology, that derives its concepts from observation of the behavior of living organisms.
[1955–60]
behav′ioral sci′entist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

behavioral science

1. Any of various scientific disciplines, including sociology and anthropology, that involve observing the actions of human beings.
2. Any scientific discipline in which the behavior of people or animals is studied, such as sociology or psychology.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in periodicals archive ?
In his work with the Behavioral Science Committee, Miller hoped to build on previous efforts at establishing integrative programmes in social science research, particularly empirical approaches.
Family medicine has a venerable heritage of behavioral science teaching in residencies, but residents usually experience teaming with behavioral scientists in a faculty-learner relationship.
Analysis of the development of the two sub-groups, the Science group and the Health and Behavioral Science (HBSc) group, was carried out on two issues: the difference between time1 and time2 in each criterion area for both the Science and the HBSc sub-groups and the difference between the rate of development for the Science group as opposed to the HBSc group.
In this unique and groundbreaking volume for organ donor professionals, applied social psychologists, health psychologists, policy makers, and academics and students in health communication, Siegel and Alvaro (behavioral and organizational sciences and Institute of Health Psychology and Prevention Science, Claremont Graduate U.) bring together 20 chapters drawn from Claremont Graduate U.'s Annual Applied Social Psychology Symposium that introduce and survey social and behavioral science perspectives on organ donation.
As Debora Hammond (President-Elect of the International Society for the Systems Sciences and Deputy Editor of this journal) recounts, in her excellent book 'The Science of Synthesis', there was immense interest in the notion of behavioral science in the post-war period.
First, while many of the early attempts to incorporate behavioral science teaching in U.S.
Realizing that these bombs had the potential to kill or injure hundreds of employees and cause millions of dollars in damage, FBI agents from the NCAVC and the FBI Academy's Behavioral Science Unit immediately began analyzing the recording of the call.
The National Institutes of Health announced today that it will fund 14 grants focusing on factors that influence the careers of women in biomedical and behavioral science and engineering.
This final issue of Systems Research and Behavioral Science, in 2004, sees the use of a wide variety of systems ideas in a diverse range of application areas.
A decade ago, this journal marked its tenth anniversary with a special issue on Behavioral Science in Family Medicine.

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