behaviourism


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Related to behaviourism: Cognitivism

behaviourism

(bɪˈheɪvjəˌrɪzəm) or

behaviorism

n
1. (Psychology) a school of psychology that regards the objective observation of the behaviour of organisms (usually by means of automatic recording devices) as the only proper subject for study and that often refuses to postulate any intervening mechanisms between the stimulus and the response
2. (Philosophy) the doctrine that the mind has no separate existence but that statements about the mind and mental states can be analysed into statements about actual and potential behaviour. Compare materialism2 See also mind-body problem
beˈhaviourist, beˈhaviorist adj, n
beˌhaviourˈistic, beˌhaviorˈistic adj
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.behaviourism - an approach to psychology that emphasizes observable measurable behaviorbehaviourism - an approach to psychology that emphasizes observable measurable behavior
experimental psychology, psychonomics - the branch of psychology that uses experimental methods to study psychological issues
reflexology - the study of reflex action as it relates to the behavior of organisms
Translations

behaviourism

behaviorism (US) [bɪˈheɪvjərɪzəm] Nconductismo m, behaviorismo m

behaviourism

[bɪˈheɪvjərɪzəm] (British) behaviorism (US) nbehaviorisme m

behaviourism

, (US) behaviorism

behaviourism

behaviorism (Am) [bɪˈheɪvjərɪzm] ncomportamentismo
References in classic literature ?
Behaviourism has not, however, sprung from observing the folly of men.
Everyone will find something to enjoy, from Lisa McInerney's Bad Behaviourism, a candid testimony to jammy accomplishments or Claire Brunton's naked truth in When All You Need Is A Fan Heater.
Thus, given the behaviourist paradigm failure to account for complexities surrounding necessary and sufficient conditions for the occurrence of successful conditioning and learning, there has been a paradigm shift from behaviourism to cognitivism (McLaren and Mackintosh, 1989).
Moreover, it was discovered that pre-service teachers expressed opinions mainly about behaviourism and constructivism as teaching theories and recitation and discussion as teaching methods.
Cognitive science and behaviourism. British Journal of Psychology, 76, 291-301.
The psychological paradigms of behaviourism, North American psychiatry, and alternative self-help models further distract people from reality by defining stress, guilt, and malaise as unnecessary, undesirable states of being rather than as realistic reactions to the state of the world that requires action and engagement.
Part I tiffed as the Foundations, Developmental Issues and Assessment initiates a motivated novice into the understanding of behaviour therapy by explaining the basic concepts related to behaviourism. This part is divided into five chapters--viz., The Philosophical and Historical Foundations, Conceptual Issues, Psychobiological Basis of Behaviour Therapy, Developmental Perspective, and Behavioural Assessment and Diagnosis.
He espoused phenomenalism and behaviourism. The difference between Wittgenstein's earlier and later philosophy is primarily constituted by the post-1930 change in the form of reductionism, which he favoured.
Modern behaviourism has its origin in the work of Pavlov, Watson and Skinner.
His work led, in the early 20th century, to the foundation of behaviourism, and to the development of what its proponents called the 'scientific' study of human beings.
Boring, the functionalism and evolutionism characteristic of American psychology preceding the founding of behaviourism were "natural to the temper of America" and were but "different aspects of the same attitude towards human nature."(2) No less discerningly, John Mills argues that "forms of behaviorism, usually unacknowledged and unnamed, pervaded American social science from the beginning" (p.
Bowlby notes acerbically on Barthes (one of the several OK, or KO, names adduced by virtually all contributors): 'Lacan meets behaviourism.'