beingless

beingless

(ˈbiːɪŋlɪs)
adj
having no existence
References in periodicals archive ?
and this essential occurrence no longer needs beings." The difference "distinguishes being and what is the beingless [das Seinlose]." The beingless is not the abandonment of beings that happens in metaphysics, but rather more originarily "the inceptual dispropriation [Enteignis] in the sense of withholding." Inceptual dispropriation marks the most originary moment of the event and the difference out of which multiple dimensions or differentiations of the event unfold.
In fact, as I will discuss in my reading of the "The Airplanes of Brescia," tourism becomes for Kafka a "beingless" ("wesenloser") act of observation.
Where Meinong believed that if we can say true things about beingless objects, such as "Sherlock Holmes is a detective," than they must be genuine objects worthy of scientific study, Russell counter-argued that acknowledging "facts" about nonexistent objects violated key logic principles, specifically the law of non-contradiction and the law of the excluded middle.
This is not to say that these characters (Kurtz, Marlow, and Witt) become beingless; quite the opposite is true.
However, inasmuch as all beings intrinsically have Being just as Being always exists in the context of beings, so that there can be no Beingless beings in the same manner that there is no beingless Being, Heidegger contends that metaphysics serves as the ground of these sciences.
Within five pages, these poor women have become "beingless beings": "These two beings have been rendered even more beingless by their presence, courtesy of the book's automatism, in a scene from which they are absent" (117-8).