belabour


Also found in: Thesaurus.

be·la·bour

 (bĭ-lā′bər)
v. Chiefly British
Variant of belabor.

belabour

(bɪˈleɪbə) or

belabor

vb (tr)
1. to beat severely; thrash
2. to attack verbally; criticize harshly
3. an obsolete word for labour

belabour


Past participle: belaboured
Gerund: belabouring

Imperative
belabour
belabour
Present
I belabour
you belabour
he/she/it belabours
we belabour
you belabour
they belabour
Preterite
I belaboured
you belaboured
he/she/it belaboured
we belaboured
you belaboured
they belaboured
Present Continuous
I am belabouring
you are belabouring
he/she/it is belabouring
we are belabouring
you are belabouring
they are belabouring
Present Perfect
I have belaboured
you have belaboured
he/she/it has belaboured
we have belaboured
you have belaboured
they have belaboured
Past Continuous
I was belabouring
you were belabouring
he/she/it was belabouring
we were belabouring
you were belabouring
they were belabouring
Past Perfect
I had belaboured
you had belaboured
he/she/it had belaboured
we had belaboured
you had belaboured
they had belaboured
Future
I will belabour
you will belabour
he/she/it will belabour
we will belabour
you will belabour
they will belabour
Future Perfect
I will have belaboured
you will have belaboured
he/she/it will have belaboured
we will have belaboured
you will have belaboured
they will have belaboured
Future Continuous
I will be belabouring
you will be belabouring
he/she/it will be belabouring
we will be belabouring
you will be belabouring
they will be belabouring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been belabouring
you have been belabouring
he/she/it has been belabouring
we have been belabouring
you have been belabouring
they have been belabouring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been belabouring
you will have been belabouring
he/she/it will have been belabouring
we will have been belabouring
you will have been belabouring
they will have been belabouring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been belabouring
you had been belabouring
he/she/it had been belabouring
we had been belabouring
you had been belabouring
they had been belabouring
Conditional
I would belabour
you would belabour
he/she/it would belabour
we would belabour
you would belabour
they would belabour
Past Conditional
I would have belaboured
you would have belaboured
he/she/it would have belaboured
we would have belaboured
you would have belaboured
they would have belaboured
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.belabour - to work at or to absurd lengthbelabour - to work at or to absurd length; "belabor the obvious"
work at, work on - to exert effort in order to do, make, or perform something; "the child worked at the multiplication table until she had it down cold"
2.belabour - beat soundlybelabour - beat soundly        
beat up, work over, beat - give a beating to; subject to a beating, either as a punishment or as an act of aggression; "Thugs beat him up when he walked down the street late at night"; "The teacher used to beat the students"
3.belabour - attack verbally with harsh criticismbelabour - attack verbally with harsh criticism; "She was belabored by her fellow students"
criticise, criticize, pick apart, knock - find fault with; express criticism of; point out real or perceived flaws; "The paper criticized the new movie"; "Don't knock the food--it's free"

belabour

verb
1. beat, hit, strike, knock, punch, belt (informal), whip, deck (slang), batter, thrash, pound, flog, clobber (slang), tonk (informal), cudgel, thwack, lambast(e), lay one on (slang), drub Men began to belabour his shoulders with sticks.
2. attack, blast, put down, criticize, have a go (at) (informal), censure, malign, berate, castigate, revile, vilify, flame (informal), tear into (informal), lay into (informal), flay, diss (slang, chiefly U.S.), go for the jugular, lambast(e), excoriate They have been belaboured on all sides for withdrawing from the cup.
3. dwell on, go on about, linger over, harp on about, over-elaborate, over-emphasize, tarry over I will not belabour the point.
Translations

belabour

belabor (US) [bɪˈleɪbəʳ] VT (o.f.) (= beat) → apalear (fig) (with insults) → atacar; (with questions) → asediar (with con)

belabour

[bɪˈleɪbər] (British) belabor (US) vt
(= labour) [+ point] → insister sur
(= pummel) → rouer de coups, rosser

belabour

, (US) belabor
vt
(= hit)einschlagen auf (+acc)
(fig, with insults etc) → überhäufen; (with questions) → beschießen, bearbeiten

belabour

belabor (Am) [bɪˈleɪbəʳ] vt (beat) → bastonare
to belabour with (fig) (questions) → tartassare di (insults) → bombardare di
References in classic literature ?
They, mistaking the frantic cries of Mynheer Isaac for demonstrations of joy, began to belabour him with kicks and cuffs, such as could not have been administered in better style by any prize-fighter on the other side of the Channel.
One of the muleteers in attendance, who could not have had much good nature in him, hearing the poor prostrate man blustering in this style, was unable to refrain from giving him an answer on his ribs; and coming up to him he seized his lance, and having broken it in pieces, with one of them he began so to belabour our Don Quixote that, notwithstanding and in spite of his armour, he milled him like a measure of wheat.
"See what lengths you can drive a desperate man to!" He may hit me on the head and they may belabour me from behind.
To confess the truth, I am afraid Mr Jones was one of these; for though he was attacked and violently belaboured with the aforesaid weapon, he could not be provoked to make any resistance; but in a most cowardly manner applied, with many entreaties, to his antagonist to desist from pursuing her blows; in plain English, he only begged her with the utmost earnestness to hear him; but before he could obtain his request, my landlord himself entered into the fray, and embraced that side of the cause which seemed to stand very little in need of assistance.
While Ned Land, clinging to the bows, belaboured the gigantic animal with blows from his harpoon, the creature's teeth were buried in the gunwale, and it lifted the whole thing out of the water, as a lion does a roebuck.
One day I was frolicking with a little spirited urchin, some six years old, who chased me with a piece of bamboo about three feet long, with which he occasionally belaboured me.
The 25-year-old had assisted her father but has moved along with a dozen horses to Staffordshire trainer Kevin Frost and rode one of those, Belabour, in the 1m4f handicap for lady amateur riders.
NOTTINGHAM: 1.45 Implicit, 2.20 Team Decision, 2.55 Whitehall, 3.30 MAID TO REMEMBER (NAP), 4.05 Elysian Flyer, 4.40 Spot Lite, 5.15 Belabour.
4.10 STREET SENSATION 5.45 CRYSTAL DEAUVILLE HISAR 6.15 THE HOODED CLAW PULSATING 6.45 WARBA CORONATION DAY 7.15 TROPICS Raashdy 7.45 BELABOUR ANDOK 8.15 RAINBOW REBEL SWORD EXCEED 8.45 SWORD EXCEED PEACE TERMS 9.15 KINGOFMERROWS TOTEPOOL SILVER TROPHY HANDICAP 3) (1) 2m 3f 100yds Winner PS28,475 (1 47-OLD GuArD (168) P Nicholls 6 11-12...................2 F6-ALAry (212) C Tizzard 7 11-8..................
Beattie's study of the ways in which Britain has been shaped by the winds that belabour it throws up examples both benign (like Chesil Beach, a 'prodigious accumulation of shingle', and the archetypal example of a wind-made feature) and catastrophic, like the once-thriving Suffolk port of Dunwich which was the largest settlement in Britain to be lost to coastal erosion [see page 72 for more on this].
I will not belabour the details of this very unfortunate tragedy.
On St David's Day, one of your national emblems became in grave danger from that lowly vegetable, the dreaded brussels sprout, where highly-paid bureaucrats have nothing better to do than dream up the next set of regulations with which to belabour you (and us).