References in classic literature ?
You may believe that such-and-such a horse will win the Derby.
To him it meant the Church of England, and not to believe in its tenets was a sign of wilfulness which could not fail of punishment here or hereafter.
Remember my words: `If you return home safely, I shall believe God has forgiven you, and I will forgive you also.
Often after dark, when I was pulling the bellows for Joe, and we were singing Old Clem, and when the thought how we used to sing it at Miss Havisham's would seem to show me Estella's face in the fire, with her pretty hair fluttering in the wind and her eyes scorning me, - often at such a time I would look towards those panels of black night in the wall which the wooden windows then were, and would fancy that I saw her just drawing her face away, and would believe that she had come at last.
To me the convalescent would it now be suffering and torment to believe in such phantoms: suffering would it now be to me, and humiliation.
She would not wound the feelings of her sister on any account, and yet to say what she did not believe was impossible.
The disseminators of this tale are the accusers whom I dread; for their hearers are apt to fancy that such enquirers do not believe in the existence of the gods.
He felt himself a king, not because he believed that he had made an impression on Anna--he did not yet believe that,--but because the impression she had made on him gave him happiness and pride.
do not believe in God, said Pierre, regretfully and with an effort, feeling it essential to speak the whole truth.
You believe then," he said, "after a moment's pause, "that the poison was intended for me?
I believe that I remember it," he said; "you were a mournful-looking object in a very soiled pinafore and most untidy hair.
It was a hazardous enterprise both for him and for her, but he thought it necessary to consult with her on the subject of her projected departure, if not to calm her apprehensions respecting his health, and the worst result was a slight relapse of his illness, for no one knew of the visit but the inmates of the old Hall, except myself; and I believe it had not been his intention to mention it to me, for when I came to see him the next day, and observed he was not so well as he ought to have been, he merely said he had caught cold by being out too late in the evening.