belletrist


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bel·let·rist

 (bĕl-lĕt′rĭst)
n.
A writer of belles-lettres.

bel·let′rism n.
bel′le·tris′tic (bĕl′ĭ-trĭs′tĭk) adj.

belletrist

(bɛlˈlɛtrɪst)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a writer of belles-lettres
belˈletrism n
belletristic adj
References in periodicals archive ?
Emma Roberts has turned her lifelong love of reading into a pet project she calls Belletrist. A website and social media for Belletrist celebrate all things books.
Frequently miscast as a belletrist, Dowden's description of Waterloo as the "triumphant catastrophe" to a "great drama" pits an oxymoronic combination of categories against a confident assertion of narrative unity.
Other scholars have pointed out to the rootedness of belletrist practices in local tradition and folk practices (Helbich 2010).
1685]) also depicts al-Zuhara as descending and assuming the shape of a woman; note also the ninth-century Basran belletrist Jahiz, Kitab al-Hayawan (7 vols, in 2, ed.
His most recognized works are screenplays--"Boxcar Bertha" "Battle for the Planet of the Apes" and "The Omega Man"--but he had hoped for the legacy of a belletrist. "I don't give a damn about TV or film for that matter" he once wrote.
As is only to be expected, historians' critical antennae have been set twitching by the fact that this immodest task--a multi-volume history of the full sweep of the national past from Rus' onward--has once again been claimed by a belletrist, not a historian; Akunin consciously models himself on Karamzin.
Not only had Chekhov elaborated the positional style of his own writing, but he also introduced the idea of the two styles in The Seagull by depicting a belletrist, Trigorin, and a young writer, Treplev.
This was the seducer in him, the orator with the tongue of an angel, the belletrist of the conscious mind.
"Bonhomie for a Southern Belletrist." New Yorker 72.1 (1996): 36.
And the best kind of screenwriter will be halfway between an unsuccessful dramatist and a belletrist who has tired of belles-lettres.
Some twenty-five years after the publication of the first volumes of Tristram Shandy, Presbyterian clergyman and belletrist Hugh Blair asserts "the exercise of taste ...
In its first year there were many good belletrist contributions, ranging from Osbert Sitwell on the Courtauld collection to Desmond MacCarthy on John Lavery.