bemusedly


Also found in: Thesaurus.

be·muse

 (bĭ-myo͞oz′)
tr.v. be·mused, be·mus·ing, be·mus·es
1. To cause to be bewildered; confuse.
2. To occupy the attention of; absorb or engross: The book bemused him for days.
3. Usage Problem To cause to be mildly or wryly amused: "Unlike William McKinley, whose priggishness bemused him, Roosevelt had no compunctions about smoking cigars in public" (Joseph Conlin).

be·mus′ed·ly (-myo͞o′zĭd-lē) adv.
be·muse′ment n.
Usage Note: The word bemused is sometimes used to mean "amused, especially when finding something wryly funny," as in The stream of jokes from the comedian left the audience bemused, with some breaking out into guffaws. Most of the Usage Panel does not like this usage, with 78 percent rejecting this sentence in our 2005 survey. By contrast, 84 percent accepted a sentence in which bemused means "confused."
Translations

bemusedly

[bɪˈmjuːzɪdli] adv [look, stare] → d'un air perplexe

bemusedly

advratlos
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
You almost expect Shakil to suddenly come and recline bemusedly, dodging the commentaries of his acerbic wife, played by Bushra Ansari.
Goldacre relays that he enjoys speaking with people who disagree with him; however, as he bemusedly explains, "repeatedly I meet individuals who are eager to share their views on science despite the fact that they have never done an experiment" (3).
It is still there and I smile bemusedly whenever I visit the village and see it.
"Thanks," I recall replying, shrugging bemusedly to myself.
Don Lavoie bemusedly raises the point that democracy does not provide a fail-safe to the totalitarian problem because there is no reason why such political changes would not lead to a drastic centralization of economic and political power (1985, 137).
A hovering Psyche bemusedly looks down on the sleeper, who appears limp, flaccid--not just his penis but his whole being.
"That's all I do now," Miguel says bemusedly, "play this game 'game', when admittedly he's not struggling to pay for groceries, could look insensitive, but Miguel sees what he does as "a puzzle or an equation - it's a bit like sudoku, but more hands-on".
"That's all I do now," Miguel says bemusedly, "play this game Calling cooking on a budget a 'game', when admittedly he's not struggling to pay for groceries, could look insensitive, but Miguel sees what he does as "a puzzle or an equation - it's a bit like sudoku, but more hands-on".
But whereas Daniel Plainview in the earlier film was a vector of pure, demonic ambition, Reynolds Woodcock bemusedly discovers himself to be one leg of a complicated emotional triangle.
The other sides are Cyril and Alma (Vicky Krieps), a non-British waitress in a provincial British restaurant who becomes Reynolds' model, mistress and muse.
He discusses the importance of good health as well as for keyboard players to look after their hands, and bemusedly recites of his first meeting with the "hard-hitting" pianist Glen Gould who refused his proffered handshake in order to protect his own hands (despite Kirkpatrick being a clavichord player and perhaps having a more gentle handshake).
So, however valuable the historical correctives to national myth, I want to suggest that we are not quite free to treat 1776 in this way--to contextualize it away as "foreign" to our present or to be bemusedly ironic about it--precisely because we live still in the same political community--the nation--that was created in 1776 and the historical narratives we tell about it are and continue to be constitutive of that political community.