benchmarking


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bench·mark

 (bĕnch′märk′)
n.
1. A standard by which something can be measured or judged: "Inflation ... is a great distorter of seemingly fixed economic ideas and benchmarks" (Benjamin M. Friedman).
2. often bench mark A surveyor's mark made on a stationary object of previously determined position and elevation and used as a reference point, as in geologic surveys or tidal observations.
tr.v. bench·marked, bench·mark·ing, bench·marks
To measure (a rival's product) according to specified standards in order to compare it with and improve one's own product.

[From the use of the surveyor's mark as a place to insert an angle iron that serves as a bench, or level surface, for the support for a leveling rod.]

benchmarking

(ˈbɛntʃmɑːkɪŋ)
n
(Commerce) commerce comparison of practices within different companies, to decide what is most effficient
Translations
référenciation

benchmarking

[ˈbɛntʃmɑːrkɪŋ] (BUSINESS) nbenchmarking m, étalonnage m des performances

benchmarking

n (Econ) → Benchmarking nt
References in periodicals archive ?
APQC then compared the benchmarking practices of supply chain functions against the practices of all other types of organizational functions.
The results from APQC's survey show that supply chain functions are more likely to have some formal structure for their benchmarking efforts.
Keywords: Manufacturing SMEs, benchmarking, efficiency performance, Growth SMEs, Operation Management.
To achieve it, they add a code into their device that can automatically sprint into action when a benchmark test from a popular benchmarking app is carried out on the device.
If possible, you want your benchmarking environment to share literally no components with other active systems.
In organizations, benchmarking is a proactive process that facilitates change to achieve superior performance (Camp 1989).
Much is being said about benchmarking. The term comes from the Middle Ages.
However, when benchmarking is performed in a vacuum without a standardized process, the results can be misleading.
Parallel to the reinventing government of the early 1990s, local governments began to join benchmarking consortiums that represent the form of benchmarking known as comparison of performance statistics as benchmarks (Ammons, 2000).
The US Energy Group Benchmarking Service makes the process of reporting energy usage to the EPA's Portfolio Manager hassle-free for owners and managers by handling both the administrative and technical details of complying with the legislation.
Summary paragraph: Plan benchmarking now means more than participation rate