bends


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bend 1

(bĕnd)
v. bent (bĕnt), bend·ing, bends
v. tr.
1.
a. To cause to assume a curved or angular shape: bend a piece of iron into a horseshoe.
b. To bring (a bow, for example) into a state of tension by drawing on a string or line.
c. To force to assume a different direction or shape, according to one's own purpose: "Few will have the greatness to bend history itself, but each of us can work to change a small portion of events" (Robert F. Kennedy).
d. To misrepresent; distort: bend the truth.
e. To relax or make an exception to: bend a rule to allow more members into the club.
2. To cause to swerve from a straight line; deflect: Light is bent as it passes through water.
3. To render submissive; subdue: "[His] words so often bewitched crowds and bent them to his will" (W. Bruce Lincoln).
4. To apply (the mind) closely: "The weary naval officer goes to bed at night having bent his brain all day to a scheme of victory" (Jack Beatty).
5. Nautical To fasten: bend a mainsail onto the boom.
v. intr.
1.
a. To deviate from a straight line or position: The lane bends to the right at the bridge.
b. To assume a curved, crooked, or angular form or direction: The saplings bent in the wind.
2. To incline the body; stoop.
3. To make a concession; yield.
4. To apply oneself closely; concentrate: She bent to her task.
n.
1.
a. The act or fact of bending.
b. The state of being bent.
2. Something bent: a bend in the road.
3. Nautical
a. A knot that joins a rope to a rope or another object.
b. bends The thick planks in a ship's side; wales.
4. bends (used with a sing. or pl. verb) Decompression sickness. Used with the.
Idioms:
around the bend Slang
Mentally deranged; crazy.
bend (one's) elbow Slang
To drink alcoholic beverages.
bend out of shape Slang
To annoy or anger.
bend (or lean) over backward
To make an effort greater than is required.
bend (someone's) ear Slang
To talk to at length, usually excessively.

[Middle English benden, from Old English bendan; see bhendh- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

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bend2

bend 2

(bĕnd)
n. Heraldry
A band passing from the upper dexter corner of an escutcheon to the lower sinister corner.

[Middle English, from Old English bend, band, and from Old French bende, bande, band (of Germanic origin; see bhendh- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots).]

Bend

 (bĕnd)
A city of central Oregon on the Deschutes River in the eastern foothills of the Cascade Range.

bends

(bɛndz)
pl n
(Pathology) (functioning as singular or plural) a nontechnical name for decompression sickness
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bends - pain resulting from rapid change in pressurebends - pain resulting from rapid change in pressure
illness, sickness, unwellness, malady - impairment of normal physiological function affecting part or all of an organism
Translations

bends

[ˈbɛndz] npl [diver] → maladie f des caissons

bends

n the bendsdie Taucherkrankheit

bends

[bɛndz] npl (Med) the bendsun'embolia

bends, the

npl enfermedad f por descompresión
References in classic literature ?
In one of the bends of the river, where the channel made a deep curve under impending banks, they suddenly heard yells and shouts above them, and beheld the cliffs overhead covered with armed savages.
22d of May, that the river ahead made a great bend which would take up the navigation of the following day, he determined to profit by the circumstance.
Bend hither, that I may place it in your breast; no hand can take it hence, till I unsay the spell that holds it there.
And when the tinsmiths came, bringing with them all their tools in baskets, she inquired, "Can you straighten out those dents in the Tin Woodman, and bend him back into shape again, and solder him together where he is broken?
Be it said, that though I had felt such a strong repugnance to his smoking in the bed the night before, yet see how elastic our stiff prejudices grow when love once comes to bend them.
After considering the matter carefully, Tip decided that the best place to locate Jack would be at the bend in the road, a little way from the house.
So intent was Mombi on the treasures she had gained that when she turned the bend in the road and caught a glimpse of the man, she merely nodded and said:
Your Grace's power, supported, as it is, by so many men-at-arms, may indeed easily strip and scourge me, but cannot compel me to bend or to draw my bow.
For never did so strong a hand bend a bow, or so true an eye direct a shaft.
And now, with the world before me, whither should I bend my steps?
The new tube bender features greater capacity in both tube diameter, bend radius and wall thickness.
But the data report states that the architect/ engineer should review the bending procedure and notify the contractor's reinforcing bar placing inspector who should discuss the bending procedure with the placing foreman to ensure that the bends conform to the ACI 315 requirements.