benevolence


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be·nev·o·lence

 (bə-nĕv′ə-ləns)
n.
1. An inclination to perform kind, charitable acts.
2.
a. A kindly act.
b. A gift given out of generosity.
3. A compulsory tax or payment exacted by some English sovereigns without the consent of Parliament.

benevolence

(bɪˈnɛvələns)
n
1. Also: benevolentness inclination or tendency to help or do good to others; charity
2. an act of kindness
3. (Historical Terms) (in the Middle Ages) a forced loan or contribution exacted by English kings from their nobility and subjects

be•nev•o•lence

(bəˈnɛv ə ləns)

n.
1. desire to do good to others; goodwill; charity.
2. an act of kindness; charitable gift.
3. (formerly) a forced contribution to an English sovereign.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.benevolence - disposition to do goodbenevolence - disposition to do good    
love - a strong positive emotion of regard and affection; "his love for his work"; "children need a lot of love"
beneficence - doing good; feeling beneficent
malevolence, malignity - wishing evil to others
2.benevolence - an inclination to do kind or charitable acts
kindness - the quality of being warmhearted and considerate and humane and sympathetic
brotherly love, charity - a kindly and lenient attitude toward people
3.benevolence - an act intending or showing kindness and good willbenevolence - an act intending or showing kindness and good will
benignity, kindness - a kind act

benevolence

benevolence

noun
Translations
blahovůleshovívavost
generøsitetgodhjertethed
góîvild
dosnumasgeradarystėgeranoriškaigero linkintislinkėjimas gero
augstsirdībalabsirdībalabvēlība
benevolencia
cömertlikyardımseverlik

benevolence

[bɪˈnevələns] Nbenevolencia f

benevolence

[bɪˈnɛvələns] n
[ruler, system] → bienveillance f
(= kindness) → générosité f
(= good will) → bienveillance f

benevolence

nWohlwollen nt; (of smile, gesture)Gutmütigkeit f; (as character trait) → Güte f; (of emperor, judge)Milde f

benevolence

[bɪˈnɛvələns] nbenevolenza

benevolence

(biˈnevələns) noun
generosity and desire to do good.
beˈnevolent adjective
a benevolent father.
beˈnevolently adverb
References in classic literature ?
It is not easy to forbear reflecting with how little reason these men profess themselves the followers of Jesus, who left this great characteristic to His disciples, that they should be known by loving one another, by universal and unbounded charity and benevolence.
I fear it was the dullness of trade, rather than any considerations of benevolence, that induced our mistress to depart from her rule.
To our family she has always been represented in softened colours by the benevolence of Mr.
But still the dispute concerning the justice of it remains; for some persons think, that justice consists in benevolence, others think it just that the powerful should govern: in the midst of these contrary opinions, there are no reasons sufficient to convince us, that the right of being master and governor ought not to be placed with those who have the greatest abilities.
His dark, square countenance, with its almost shaggy depth of eyebrows, was naturally impressive, and would, perhaps, have been rather stern, had not the gentleman considerately taken upon himself to mitigate the harsh effect by a look of exceeding good-humor and benevolence.
The Commander stands for the virtues of wisdom, sincerely, benevolence, courage and strictness.
Pierre during the last two years, as a result of his continual absorption in abstract interests and his sincere contempt for all else, had acquired in his wife's circle, which did not interest him, that air of unconcern, indifference, and benevolence toward all, which cannot be acquired artificially and therefore inspires involuntary respect.
I was struck with a profound veneration at the sight of Brutus, and could easily discover the most consummate virtue, the greatest intrepidity and firmness of mind, the truest love of his country, and general benevolence for mankind, in every lineament of his countenance.
His beaming, chubby face was a picture of benevolence and kind-heartedness.
If there be in this work, as some have been pleased to say, a stronger picture of a truly benevolent mind than is to be found in any other, who that knows you, and a particular acquaintance of yours, will doubt whence that benevolence hath been copied?
The worst was, that with his big blue eyes, and his polished head, and his long white hair, and his bottle-green legs stretched out before him, terminating in his easy shoes easily crossed at the instep, he had a radiant appearance of having in his extensive benevolence made the drink for the human species, while he himself wanted nothing but his own milk of human kindness.
I shall surprise you very much, I have no doubt,' said Rose, naturally embarrassed; 'but you once showed great benevolence and goodness to a very dear young friend of mine, and I am sure you will take an interest in hearing of him again.