bestial

(redirected from bestialising)
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bes·tial

 (bĕs′chəl, bēs′-)
adj.
1. Of or resembling a beast: a bestial roar.
2. Marked by brutality or depravity; brutal or depraved: capable of the most bestial acts imaginable.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin bēstiālis, from Latin bēstia, beast.]

bes′tial·ly adv.

bestial

(ˈbɛstɪəl)
adj
1. brutal or savage
2. sexually depraved; carnal
3. lacking in refinement; brutish
4. of or relating to a beast
[C14: from Late Latin bestiālis, from Latin bestia beast]
ˈbestially adv

bes•tial

(ˈbɛs tʃəl, ˈbis-)

adj.
1. of, pertaining to, or having the form of a beast.
2. lacking reason or intelligence.
3. debased; inhuman.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Late Latin bēstiālis; see beast]
bes′tial•ly, adv.

Bestial

 collective term for domestic animals, 1393; replaced by cattle in the 17th century.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.bestial - resembling a beastbestial - resembling a beast; showing lack of human sensibility; "beastly desires"; "a bestial nature"; "brute force"; "a dull and brutish man"; "bestial treatment of prisoners"
inhumane - lacking and reflecting lack of pity or compassion; "humans are innately inhumane; this explains much of the misery and suffering in the world"; "biological weapons are considered too inhumane to be used"

bestial

adjective brutal, low, animal, gross, savage, beastly, primitive, degraded, sensual, vile, sordid, barbaric, inhuman, depraved, carnal, brutish, barbarous, scungy (Austral. & N.Z.), beastlike the bestial conditions into which the city has sunk

bestial

adjective
Showing or suggesting a disposition to be violently destructive without scruple or restraint:
Translations

bestial

[ˈbestɪəl] ADJbestial

bestial

[ˈbɛstiəl] adj (= brutish) [behaviour, situation] → bestial(e)

bestial

adj acts, crueltybestialisch, tierisch; person, look, appearance (= cruel)brutal; (= carnal)tierisch

bestial

[ˈbɛstɪəl] adjbestiale

bestial

a. bestial, irracional, brutal.
References in periodicals archive ?
The punishment that the enraged men of the station devise for Jevon 'when the ladies had gone' (91) is revealing because it encodes, at the level of slapstick, so many of the characteristic features of political exception as a grim 'festive' delegation of sovereign power: Jevon's face is blackened with burnt cork and tinted with gelatine in a suggestive 'colouring' of his racial identity, 'this was punishment, not play, remember'; (92) his hair is filled with meringue-cream, and in a scene that evokes the bestialising capability of the charivari (and its subversive taboo of cannibalism) the hapless outsider has ham-frills tied around his neck and cutlet-frills secured on his wrists.
43) Compare the Boscotrecase Polyphemus wall painting, where sympathetic and bestialising literary treatments are literally juxtaposed; for which, see R.