bestialism

bestialism

(ˈbɛstɪəlɪzəm)
n
1. the state of beasts
2. the state of lacking reason
References in periodicals archive ?
Percy, in turn, identifies the twin forms of inauthentic selfhood (despair) as angelism and bestialism. Accordingly, Dr.
Percy would be no less alarmed, I believe, by the ways in which the bestialism of the right would plunge us fatally beneath our self-transcendent character.
The bill also reinforces the perception of homosexuality as deviant sexual behavior, akin to bestialism and necrophilia.
Thomas More has discovered within himself and others a fatal split between soul and body, leaving individuals a prey to an "angelism" that lives on an abstract mental level cut off from their bodily, historical selves, thus causing them to fall into a recurrent "bestialism" shown in violence, alcoholism, and sexual license (LitR 26).
The other modern malady, Percy says, is "bestialism," which usually manifests itself in an overwhelming sexual appetite and seeks "sex with strangers." But the two can be mixed together in an "angelism-bestialism" strain.
the Thomistic notion as "angelism" and "bestialism")
First, it devotes special attention to nature imagery, showing how Will Barrett and Tom More, caught up in their dances of angelism and bestialism, fail to see the signs of God's grandeur about them.
The opposite of angelism is not bodiliness but bestialism. "We are neither angels nor pigs," cries out one of Walker Percy's fictional heroes, "but sovereign wayfarers!" to satisfy animal urges or instinct; that is what makes us different from the rest of the animal kingdom.
The narrator, Tom More, calls this disorder "angelism"; a principal symptom of the disorder is "bestialism"--that is, gross bodily indulgence.
Virtually every binary opposition that Percy and other Southern writers explore--objectivity and subjectivity, transcendence and immanence, angelism and bestialism, homelessness and everydayness, the vertical search and the little way--is claimed as the territory of the fugue.
The split leads to what Percy calls angelism and bestialism, scientism and consumerism, romanticism and immanence--temptations to which his characters are prey.
That is, the incarnational essence of the sacrament helped him to live as enfleshed spirit in the concrete world, and avoid the dualism of "angelism" and "bestialism" that has riven modern man.