streptococcus

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Related to beta-hemolytic streptococci: streptococcal

strep·to·coc·cus

 (strĕp′tə-kŏk′əs)
n. pl. strep·to·coc·ci (-kŏk′sī, -kŏk′ī)
Any of various round gram-positive bacteria of the genus Streptococcus that occur in pairs or chains and can cause various infections in humans, including strep throat, erysipelas, and scarlet fever.

strep·to·coc·cal (-kŏk′əl), strep·to·coc·cic (-kŏk′sĭk, -kŏk′ĭk) adj.

streptococcus

(ˌstrɛptəʊˈkɒkəs)
n, pl -cocci (-ˈkɒkaɪ; US -ˈkɒksaɪ)
(Microbiology) any Gram-positive spherical bacterium of the genus Streptococcus, typically occurring in chains and including many pathogenic species, such as S. pyogenes, which causes scarlet fever, sore throat, etc: family Lactobacillaceae. Often shortened to: strep
streptococcal, streptococcic adj

strep•to•coc•cus

(ˌstrɛp təˈkɒk əs)

n., pl. -coc•ci (-ˈkɒk saɪ, -si)
any of several spherical bacteria of the genus Streptococcus, occurring in pairs or chains, species of which cause such diseases as tonsillitis, pneumonia, and scarlet fever.
[1875–80; < New Latin; see strepto-, coccus]
strep`to•coc′cal (-ˈkɒk əl) strep`to•coc′cic (-ˈkɒk sɪk) adj.

strep·to·coc·cus

(strĕp′tə-kŏk′əs)
Plural streptococci (strĕp′tə-kŏk′sī, strĕp′tə-kŏk′ī)
Any of various bacteria that are normally found on the skin and mucous membranes and in the digestive tract of mammals. One kind of streptococcus causes especially severe infections in humans, including strep throat, scarlet fever, pneumonia, and blood infections.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.streptococcus - spherical Gram-positive bacteria occurring in pairs or chainsstreptococcus - spherical Gram-positive bacteria occurring in pairs or chains; cause e.g. scarlet fever and tonsillitis
eubacteria, eubacterium, true bacteria - a large group of bacteria having rigid cell walls; motile types have flagella
genus Streptococcus - a genus of bacteria
Translations
streptobacillestreptococciestreptocoque

streptococcus

[ˌstreptəʊˈkɒkəs] N (streptococci (pl)) [ˌstreptəʊˈkɒkaɪ]estreptococo m

streptococcus

n pl <streptococci> → Streptokokkus m

strep·to·coc·cus

n. estreptococo, género de microorganismo de la tribu Streptococceae, bacterias gram-positivas que se agrupan en pares o cadenas y que causan enfermedades serias.
References in periodicals archive ?
90] values for each of the organism groups studied, including difficult-to-treat Gram-positive staphylococci, beta-hemolytic streptococci, enterococci, viridans group streptococci, as well as Gram-negative Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii were below the concentration of pexiganan in Locilex's topical cream formulation, indicating that the concentration of pexiganan in the current commercial scale batches should be sufficient to inhibit most infecting organisms in superficial skin and wound infections amenable to treatment with a topical antimicrobial.
pneumoniae, serogroups of beta-hemolytic streptococci and Ag detected directly in CSF and serum for the Department of Clinical Microbiology,- Part 4 - reagents, substrates bacteriological, biochemical tests to identify microorganisms, belts antibiogram (brackepoint), place the camera into cultures of blood and other body fluids, ensuring compatibility tests and procedures in microbial diagnostics manual,- Part 5 - Test for cameras mini VIDAS, VIDAS - immunofluoroenzymatyczna method with the lease of the camera beckap-in compatible with existing cameras mini VIDAS and VIDAS for the Department of Clinical Microbiology.
The most recent clinical practice guidelines published by the Infectious Diseases Society of America recommend treatment for infection with beta-hemolytic streptococci for outpatients with nonpurulent cellulitis (Clin.
Beta-hemolytic streptococci was the most common bacteria identified in 11/28 (39%) with group A and B seen more commonly in our patients.
Population-based study of invasive disease due to beta-hemolytic streptococci of groups other than A and B.
1 In adults, its etiology is primarily viral; only about 10% of cases have a bacterial cause, most commonly group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GABHS).
Antimicrobial resistance of 914 beta-hemolytic Streptococci isolated from pharyngeal swabs in Spain: results of a 1-year (1996-1997) multicenter surveillance study.
Application of the polymerase chain reaction to study the M Protein (-like) gene family in beta-hemolytic streptococci.

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