streptococcus

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Related to beta-hemolytic streptococci: streptococcal

strep·to·coc·cus

 (strĕp′tə-kŏk′əs)
n. pl. strep·to·coc·ci (-kŏk′sī, -kŏk′ī)
Any of various round gram-positive bacteria of the genus Streptococcus that occur in pairs or chains and can cause various infections in humans, including strep throat, erysipelas, and scarlet fever.

strep·to·coc·cal (-kŏk′əl), strep·to·coc·cic (-kŏk′sĭk, -kŏk′ĭk) adj.

streptococcus

(ˌstrɛptəʊˈkɒkəs)
n, pl -cocci (-ˈkɒkaɪ; US -ˈkɒksaɪ)
(Microbiology) any Gram-positive spherical bacterium of the genus Streptococcus, typically occurring in chains and including many pathogenic species, such as S. pyogenes, which causes scarlet fever, sore throat, etc: family Lactobacillaceae. Often shortened to: strep
streptococcal, streptococcic adj

strep•to•coc•cus

(ˌstrɛp təˈkɒk əs)

n., pl. -coc•ci (-ˈkɒk saɪ, -si)
any of several spherical bacteria of the genus Streptococcus, occurring in pairs or chains, species of which cause such diseases as tonsillitis, pneumonia, and scarlet fever.
[1875–80; < New Latin; see strepto-, coccus]
strep`to•coc′cal (-ˈkɒk əl) strep`to•coc′cic (-ˈkɒk sɪk) adj.

strep·to·coc·cus

(strĕp′tə-kŏk′əs)
Plural streptococci (strĕp′tə-kŏk′sī, strĕp′tə-kŏk′ī)
Any of various bacteria that are normally found on the skin and mucous membranes and in the digestive tract of mammals. One kind of streptococcus causes especially severe infections in humans, including strep throat, scarlet fever, pneumonia, and blood infections.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.streptococcus - spherical Gram-positive bacteria occurring in pairs or chainsstreptococcus - spherical Gram-positive bacteria occurring in pairs or chains; cause e.g. scarlet fever and tonsillitis
eubacteria, eubacterium, true bacteria - a large group of bacteria having rigid cell walls; motile types have flagella
genus Streptococcus - a genus of bacteria
Translations
streptobacillestreptococciestreptocoque

streptococcus

[ˌstreptəʊˈkɒkəs] N (streptococci (pl)) [ˌstreptəʊˈkɒkaɪ]estreptococo m

streptococcus

n pl <streptococci> → Streptokokkus m

strep·to·coc·cus

n. estreptococo, género de microorganismo de la tribu Streptococceae, bacterias gram-positivas que se agrupan en pares o cadenas y que causan enfermedades serias.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perianal infection, also called perianal streptococcal dermatitis, is a bright red, sharply demarcated rash that is caused by group A beta-hemolytic streptococci. Common symptoms of perianal infection include perianal rash, rectal pain & itching, blood or pus in stools, etc.
Streptococcal intertrigo is an inflammatory, superficial eruption of intertriginous skin caused by group A beta-hemolytic streptococci. Frequently misdiagnosed, streptococcal intertrigo more commonly affects infants and toddlers but is rarely reported, especially compared with other Streptococcus pyogenes infections, including impetigo, erysipelas, and cellulitis.
The isolates from the pharynx (Subset A and Subset B) were Haemophilus influenzae (12.5%), nongroup A beta-hemolytic streptococci (5.5%), S.
Laboratory testing primarily analyzes the colonization of group B, but beta-hemolytic Streptococci from other Lancefield groups, including C and G, are also revealed.
However, wound cultures of blister fluid, rapid antigen testing for group A beta-hemolytic Streptococci, and viral culture or polymerase chain reaction testing for herpes simplex virus may be considered.
Population-based study of invasive disease due to beta-hemolytic streptococci of groups other than A and B.
(26.) Broyles LN, Van Beneden C, Beall B, Facklam R, Shewmaker PL, Malpiedi P, Daily P, Reingold A, Farley MM.Population-based study of invasive disease due to beta-hemolytic streptococci of groups other than A and B.
Beta-hemolytic streptococci (BHS) are the most common causative agents of perianal streptococcal dermatitis (PSD).
"Cellulitis is usually caused by beta-hemolytic streptococci (BHS) susceptible to penicillin and other narrow-spectrum antibiotics," researchers led by Trond Bruun, MD, of the department of clinical science at the University of Bergen, Norway, wrote in a study published online on July 11, 2016, in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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