bhikkhuni


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bhikkhuni

(ˈbiːkuˌni)
n
(Buddhism) a fully ordained Buddhist nun
[Pali, literally: beggar]
References in periodicals archive ?
The order of Buddhist Nuns, the Bhikkhuni Order, was established by the Buddha himself in the fifth year following his enlightenment, but for a variety of unpleasant historical reasons, it had been extinct since 1017 C.E., which is over one thousand years.
In what follows I continue exploring the legal situation of bhikkhuni ordination, a topic already broached in two previous publications.
(However, I am doubtful if it was an entirely proper novice ordination, so I don't know if i can say I was a novice or anagarika still at that time (10-precept anagarika is safer) although we were asked to study and keep whole bhikkhuni vinaya whether ordained or not).
Coming to this point, Buddhadasa and other conservative monks and mae chi who oppose bhikkhuni ordination are right: worldly status and gender difference have no meaning, as spiritual qualities of an individual transcend these matters.
(44) In Thailand in particular the inferiority of women is confirmed by the persistent refusal of the Thai sangha to sanction the full ordination of women as bhikkhuni. (45) Lindberg Falk notes that traditionally Buddhist nuns (mae chi) resided only at temples and as such were seen more or less as 'housekeepers' for (male) monks.
Fo Guang Shan held its first dialogue between Buddhist bhikkhuni and Catholic nuns alongside the Catholic church in France last year, Hsin Bao said.
Gotami asked Buddha if she could found an order of female monks or bhikkhuni (Armstrong, 2001).
(Sujato, Bhikkhuni 72-73) Horner notes: "Kappitaka's indecent and selfish behaviour is symptomatic of the extremely low state to which monkdom could fall at that time" and maintains that other nuns did not show sympathy for the furious nuns but complained about them only to avoid upsetting monks (Women 158).
Thirdly, Anagarika Dharmapala urged the re-establishment of the Bhikkhuni Order in the various Buddhist countries where it had ceased to exist; he wrote extensively of this in his published diaries.
Venerable Bhikkhuni Thich Nu Chan Khong (representing Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh)
Kabilsingh, The Bhikkhuni Patimokkha of the Six Schools (Bangkok: Buddha Dharma Education Association, 1991): 16-19.