biblicism


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Bib·li·cist

 (bĭb′lĭ-sĭst)
n.
1. An expert on the Bible.
2. One who interprets the Bible literally.

Bib′li·cism n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

biblicism

(ˈbɪblɪˌsɪzəm)
n
(Bible) an adherence to the literal sense of the Bible
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

biblicism

a strict following of the teachings of the Bible.
See also: Bible
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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This trajectory eventually resulted in the proof-texting biblicism of the Protestant Reformers, to which Catholics replied with their own proof-texting, both claiming to have found the "original intention" of the sacred authors.
"The Bible Unwrapped" delves into issues like biblical authority, literary genre, and Christ-centered hermeneutics, and calls readers beyond either knee-jerk biblicism, on the one hand, or skeptical disregard on the other.
(10) Barry Hankins, in his first chapter on American Evangelicals: A Contemporary History of a Mainstream Religious Movement, dedicated to "Awakenings and the Beginning of American Evangelicalism," highlights David Bebbington's four essentials of evangelicalism: (1) Biblicism, (2) crucicentrism, (3) conversionism, and (4) activism (Hankins 2009, 1-2).
This approach demonstrates the biblicism common among early General Baptists, but it does not provide enough interpretation to establish doctrinal uniqueness.
Thus any argument for a Bible-inspired unity of the empire and a Biblicism underlying the culture of the society needs to be hedged with caution.
The museum certainly emphasizes the primacy of the Bible, a classic Protestant theme, yet it also promotes a narrow biblicism that bears little resemblance to the Reformation idea of sola Scriptura.
This evangelical Biblicism is a good example of what Scott (2007:303) calls a 'past-renouncing reflexive ethnotheology' in that it rejects the persistence of indigenous religious entities in any shape or form as sinful and wrong and is a common perspective among Pentecostalist Christians worldwide.
Olson outlines the key features of evangelicalism as biblicism and a growing theological sophistication.
Some might argue that pentecostal and charismatic Christianity (1) presumes a fundamentalistic biblicism that has so far resulted in an underdeveloped hermeneutics and theological method that is literalistic about what they presume to be the scriptural worldview so as to collapse the world of the text and the world in front of the text in a sometimes naive sense.
Goertz repeatedly shows Muntzer contrasting this internal soteriology with what he represents as Luther's external biblicism, his contrast of his "bitter faith" with Luther's sweet and easy reception of what is written in the Bible--his contrast of his "speaking God" with the dumb God of those who merely study Scripture.
The discipline shied away from anything that smacked of mindless Biblicism.