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bib·li·og·ra·phy

 (bĭb′lē-ŏg′rə-fē)
n. pl. bib·li·og·ra·phies
1. A list of the works of a specific author or publisher.
2.
a. A list of writings relating to a given subject: a bibliography of Latin American history.
b. A list of writings used or considered by an author in preparing a particular work.
3.
a. The description and identification of the editions, dates of issue, authorship, and typography of books or other written material.
b. A compilation of such information.

bib′li·o·graph′ic (-ə-grăf′ĭk), bib′li·o·graph′i·cal adj.
bib′li·o·graph′i·cal·ly adv.

bibliography

(ˌbɪblɪˈɒɡrəfɪ)
n, pl -phies
1. (Library Science & Bibliography) a list of books or other material on a subject
2. (Library Science & Bibliography) a list of sources used in the preparation of a book, thesis, etc
3. (Library Science & Bibliography) a list of the works of a particular author or publisher
4. (Library Science & Bibliography)
a. the study of the history, classification, etc, of literary material
b. a work on this subject
ˌbibliˈographer n
bibliographic, ˌbiblioˈgraphical adj
ˌbiblioˈgraphically adv

bib•li•og•ra•phy

(ˌbɪb liˈɒg rə fi)

n., pl. -phies.
1. a complete or selective list of works compiled upon some common principle, as authorship, subject, or printer.
2. a list of source materials that are used or consulted in the preparation of a work or that are referred to in the text.
3. the discipline that deals with the physical description, comparison, and classification of books and other printed matter.
[1670–80; < Greek bibliographía. See biblio-, -graphy]
bib`li•o•graph′ic (-əˈgræf ɪk) bib`li•o•graph′i•cal, adj.
bib`li•o•graph′i•cal•ly, adv.

bibliography

1. the science that studies the history of books, noting their physical description, publication, and editions.
2. a list of books on a particular subject or by a particular author.
3. a list of source materials used or consulted in the preparation of a work or referred to in the text. — bibliographer, n. — bibliographic, bibliographical, adj.
See also: Books

Bibliography

 a collection of book titles arranged in a special order or relating to a special subject.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bibliography - a list of writings with time and place of publication (such as the writings of a single author or the works referred to in preparing a document etc.)
list, listing - a database containing an ordered array of items (names or topics)

bibliography

noun book list, record, catalogue, list of books, list of suggested reading a select bibliography of useful books
Translations
قائِمَةٌ بالمَراجِع
bibliografieliteratura
bibliografilitteraturliste
bibliografia
bibliográfiairodalomkönyvtudomány
ritaskrá
bibliografija
bibliogrāfija
bibliografia

bibliography

[ˌbɪblɪˈɒgrəfɪ] Nbibliografía f

bibliography

[ˌbɪbliˈɒgrəfi] nbibliographie f

bibliography

nBibliografie f

bibliography

[ˌbɪblɪˈɒgrəfɪ] nbibliografia

bibliography

(bibliˈogrəfi) plural bibliˈographies noun
a list of books.

bibliography

n. bibliografía.
References in classic literature ?
The name says, indeed, so exactly and so fully what they are that little remains for their bibliographer to add beyond the meagre historical detail here given.
and Mr Hazlewood, in the periodical work entitled the British Bibliographer. From thence it has been transferred by the Reverend Charles Henry Hartsborne, M.A., editor of a very curious volume, entitled ``Ancient Metrical Tales, printed chiefly from original sources, 1829.'' Mr Hartshorne gives no other authority for the present fragment, except the article in the Bibliographer, where it is entitled the Kyng and the Hermite.
In 14 essays from a 2014 conference in Dublin, Ireland, literary scholars, historians, and bibliographers explore the changing world of writing, book selling, and reading in the Iberian Peninsula during the first half of the 17th century.
Among others, there were 188 (45.9%) Members of Editorial Board, 39 (9.5%) Editors, 39 (9.5%) Associate Editors, 34 (8.3 %) Members Advisory Board, 22 (5.4%) Subject Editors, 10 (2.4%) Editors-in-chief, 8 (2.0%) Student Editors, 7 (1.7%) Statisticians, 3 (0.7%) Bibliographers, 2 (0.5%) Deputy Editors-in-chief, 1 (0.2%) Trainee Editor and 1(0.2%) epidemiologist.
The third chapter of Blind Impressions, "Bibliographers of the Mind," is both a reassessment and an appreciation of Donald McKenzie, author of the seminal 1969 essay "Printers of the Mind." In that essay, McKenzie asserts that bibliographers draw overly strong conclusions about early modern print shop practices from the very scant evidence that stands on the resulting page.
The patriarch will be remembered for his meekness and forgiveness, but his single-handed rejuvenation of the great Church of The East and the conservation of its unique doctrines with utmost zeal, will perhaps be more pertinent to bibliographers around the world.
In one of his key chapters, 'Bibliographers of the Mind', Dane takes on Donald McKenzie's influential essay, 'Printers of the Mind' (1969) and the insistence on 'facts' among 'Old' and 'New' Bibliographers.
Historians, librarians, and bibliographers look beyond the main European centers to explore printing during the 15th and 16th centuries.
Book-jackets, more commonly referred to as dust-jackets, have only recently attracted the sustained attention of print culture scholars, bibliographers, collectors, and librarians.
But bibliographers of even twentieth-century subjects have been slow to offer full descriptions of jackets; libraries vary in their policies on preserving jackets; and it is perhaps only the premium placed on fine quality jackets by booksellers and collectors that has drawn wider attention to the importance of the jacket as part of the whole publishing event that a covered book represents.
Besides the bibliographical information on the topic "How much Theodor Grotthuss is known in Lithuania" bibliographers traced a big amount of references originating from other countries such as: Germany, Latvia, Belarus, Ukraine and USA.
NCCO's 12-member advisory board will feature scholars, bibliographers, deans of libraries, and directors of 19th-century studies to ensure that the collection has a breadth and depth of content and a clear insight into the era--enough to make any reference librarian smile.