bibliography


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bib·li·og·ra·phy

 (bĭb′lē-ŏg′rə-fē)
n. pl. bib·li·og·ra·phies
1. A list of the works of a specific author or publisher.
2.
a. A list of writings relating to a given subject: a bibliography of Latin American history.
b. A list of writings used or considered by an author in preparing a particular work.
3.
a. The description and identification of the editions, dates of issue, authorship, and typography of books or other written material.
b. A compilation of such information.

bib′li·o·graph′ic (-ə-grăf′ĭk), bib′li·o·graph′i·cal adj.
bib′li·o·graph′i·cal·ly adv.

bibliography

(ˌbɪblɪˈɒɡrəfɪ)
n, pl -phies
1. (Library Science & Bibliography) a list of books or other material on a subject
2. (Library Science & Bibliography) a list of sources used in the preparation of a book, thesis, etc
3. (Library Science & Bibliography) a list of the works of a particular author or publisher
4. (Library Science & Bibliography)
a. the study of the history, classification, etc, of literary material
b. a work on this subject
ˌbibliˈographer n
bibliographic, ˌbiblioˈgraphical adj
ˌbiblioˈgraphically adv

bib•li•og•ra•phy

(ˌbɪb liˈɒg rə fi)

n., pl. -phies.
1. a complete or selective list of works compiled upon some common principle, as authorship, subject, or printer.
2. a list of source materials that are used or consulted in the preparation of a work or that are referred to in the text.
3. the discipline that deals with the physical description, comparison, and classification of books and other printed matter.
[1670–80; < Greek bibliographía. See biblio-, -graphy]
bib`li•o•graph′ic (-əˈgræf ɪk) bib`li•o•graph′i•cal, adj.
bib`li•o•graph′i•cal•ly, adv.

bibliography

1. the science that studies the history of books, noting their physical description, publication, and editions.
2. a list of books on a particular subject or by a particular author.
3. a list of source materials used or consulted in the preparation of a work or referred to in the text. — bibliographer, n. — bibliographic, bibliographical, adj.
See also: Books

Bibliography

 a collection of book titles arranged in a special order or relating to a special subject.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bibliography - a list of writings with time and place of publication (such as the writings of a single author or the works referred to in preparing a document etc.)
list, listing - a database containing an ordered array of items (names or topics)

bibliography

noun book list, record, catalogue, list of books, list of suggested reading a select bibliography of useful books
Translations
قائِمَةٌ بالمَراجِع
bibliografieliteratura
bibliografilitteraturliste
bibliografia
bibliográfiairodalomkönyvtudomány
ritaskrá
bibliografija
bibliogrāfija
bibliografia

bibliography

[ˌbɪblɪˈɒgrəfɪ] Nbibliografía f

bibliography

[ˌbɪbliˈɒgrəfi] nbibliographie f

bibliography

nBibliografie f

bibliography

[ˌbɪblɪˈɒgrəfɪ] nbibliografia

bibliography

(bibliˈogrəfi) plural bibliˈographies noun
a list of books.

bibliography

n. bibliografía.
References in classic literature ?
It is not a part of the plan of this book to present any extended bibliography, but there are certain reference books to which the student's attention should be called.
Just because a study points to a compound having an interesting effect doesn't mean we are ready to make a broad public health recommendation." The Annual Bibliography is part of ODS' commitment to improve the quality of dietary supplement research and subsequent health messages.
Katz's bibliography of the violin is the first published attempt to achieve some measure of control over the literature of the instrument since Heron-Allen's day.
This Bibliography is the ninth in a series of bibliographies produced over the past 36 years containing references to articles, books, conference papers, and reports on the management of R&D personnel, technological innovation, science policy, and technical entrepreneurship.
A completely annotated bibliography with a technical reference manual; information on thousands of artists and their works, one of the earliest bibliographies of African American Art.
Students also need to know how to find answers to their questions on their topics, to differentiate between popular/scholarly and primary/secondary sources, to evaluate web pages, and to prepare an annotated bibliography of their sources.
Further, the very current bibliography incorporated in the notes suggests Rethinking as a kind of handbook on the subject.
Linda Krikos & Cindy Ingold, WOMEN'S STUDIES: A RECOMMENDED BIBLIOGRAPHY, THIRD EDITION.
From 1965 to 1999 he served as book review editor of Missiology, and he chaired the Documentation, Archives, and Bibliography Working Group of the International Association for Mission Studies from 1988 to 1992.
BIBLIOGRAPHY PROVIDES A COMPELLING VANTAGE from which to study the interconnection of classification, rhetoric, and the making of knowledge.
Appendices, a bibliography, and an index are included.

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