bibliomania


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bib·li·o·ma·ni·a

 (bĭb′lē-ə-mā′nē-ə, -mān′yə)
n.
An exaggerated preoccupation with the acquisition and ownership of books.

bib′li·o·ma′ni·ac′ (-ăk′) n.
bib′li·o·ma·ni′a·cal (-mə-nī′ə-kəl) adj.

bibliomania

(ˌbɪblɪəʊˈmeɪnɪə)
n
(Psychology) extreme fondness for books
ˌbiblioˈmaniˌac n, adj

bib•li•o•ma•ni•a

(ˌbɪb li oʊˈmeɪ ni ə, -ˈmeɪn yə)

n.
powerful enthusiasm for collecting books.
[1725–35; < French bibliomanie; see biblio-, -mania]
bib`li•o•ma′ni•ac, n.
bib`li•o•ma•ni′a•cal (-məˈnaɪ ə kəl) adj.

bibliomania

an excessive fondness for acquiring and possessing books. — bibliomaniac, n.bibliomaniacal, adj.
See also: Books
an excessive fondness for acquiring and possessing books.
See also: Manias
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bibliomania - preoccupation with the acquisition and possession of booksbibliomania - preoccupation with the acquisition and possession of books
acquisitiveness - strong desire to acquire and possess
Translations

bibliomania

[ˌbɪblɪəʊˈmeɪnɪə] Nbibliomanía f

bibliomania

nBibliomanie f
References in periodicals archive ?
"Bibliomania: Book Collecting, Cultural Politics, and the Rise of Literary Heritage in Romantic Britain." Representations 71 (2001): 24-47.
"Bibliomania," says Christina Burmeister, a Dubai-based clinical counsellor.
Bibliomania is an excessive fondness for collecting books; however, it is not a psychological disorder according to the American Psychiatric Association.
Visitors always ask, "Have you read them all?" I answer that I have not read them word for word but while I plead guilty to tsun-doku, or bibliomania if you like, I've skimmed through them all and know more or less what's inside.
The Story and Science of the Reading Brain (2007) de Maryanne Wolf y Theories of Reading: Books, Bodies, and Bibliomania (2006) de Karin Littau.
In her article 'Bibliomania: The strange history of compulsive book buying' for The Guardian, Lorraine Berry wrote: 'Perhaps today, bibliomania does not feel like an irrational behavior, as books have become less venerated and libraries rarer.
Even the arrival of mass-market publications in the 18th century caused some panic; as more and more people became absorbed in the newly widely available books, terms emerged such as "Bibliomania," "book madness," "reading rage," and "reading mania" (Furedi 2015, [paragraph] 5).
Whereas Osler's salutations to Jacobs usually read "Dear Jacobs," Grace confided to "Jacobus" frustrations with her husband's bibliomania and propensity to charge large fees so that he could buy expensive books.