bicameralism


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bi·cam·er·al

 (bī-kăm′ər-əl)
adj.
1. Composed of or based on two legislative chambers or branches: a bicameral legislature.
2. Medicine Composed of or having two chambers, as an abscess divided by a septum.

[bi- + Latin camera, chamber; see chamber + -al.]

bi·cam′er·al·ism n.

bicameralism

1. a legislative body having two branches, houses, or chambers.
2. advocacy of bicameral structure. Cf. unicameralism.bicameralist, n.bicameral, adj.
See also: Government
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References in periodicals archive ?
To address these challenges, there is need for an oversight mechanism managed by Parliament in a manner that respects bicameralism and eliminates undue influence and conflict of interest.
The appeal of Bicameralism was that it allowed for check and balance and prevented abuse.
It noted that international community in any form, third party mediation, facilitation, good offices or arbitration, as bicameralism between the two countries in the Spirit of Simla Agreement had failed, mainly because of the intransigence of India and its refusal for bilateral talks.
In other words, the basic premise of this argument is a policy rationale that the traditional avenues of bicameralism and presentment, as well as proper delegation of legislative authority to the executive, can be bypassed in emergency circumstances.
It constitutes a fraud on the Constitution." Passing of a Bill as a Money Bill, when it does not qualify for it, damages the delicate balance of bicameralism which is a part of the basic structure of the Constitution, said Justice Chandrachud.
In Brazil, progress was highly constrained by veto points (particularly bicameralism and federalism) and policy legacies in pensions, health care, and social assistance.
There is a renewed clamour for a reduction of the people in the National Assembly, describing bicameralism as a mere waste of money.
129) that compares four undefined bicameralism "models" according to 20 variables is inserted into a discussion of suspensive vetoes without any (nearby) reference or explanation.
Once we recognize that the executive makes law without bicameralism and presentment, we can see that a one-House veto actually protects the principle of bicameralism and presentment by preventing the executive from making law that could not pass Congress with bicameralism and presentment.
Bicameralism brings with it factionalism and partisanship.
'The intent behind bicameralism continues to be check and balance between the two houses, so designed for the enactment of better laws,' he said.