acidosis

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Related to bicarbonate ion: hydrogen carbonate, Carbonic anhydrase, Hco3

ac·i·do·sis

 (ăs′ĭ-dō′sĭs)
n.
1. Abnormally high acidity of the blood and body tissues caused by a deficiency of bicarbonates or an excess of acids other than carbonic acid. It can result from any of various acute or chronic disorders or from the ingestion of certain drugs and toxins. Also called metabolic acidosis.
2. Abnormally high acidity of the blood and body tissues caused by an excess of carbon dioxide due to hypoventilation. Also called respiratory acidosis.

ac′i·dot′ic (-dŏt′ĭk) adj.

acidosis

(ˌæsɪˈdəʊsɪs)
n
(Pathology) a condition characterized by an abnormal increase in the acidity of the blood and extracellular fluids
acidotic adj

ac•i•do•sis

(ˌæs ɪˈdoʊ sɪs)

n.
a blood condition in which the bicarbonate concentration is below normal.
[1900]
ac`i•dot′ic (-ˈdɒt ɪk) adj.

acidosis

Medicine. a condition of the blood in which the alkali reserve is lower than normal. Also called acid intoxication, autointoxication.acidotic, adj.
See also: Blood and Blood Vessels
a condition of the blood in which the alkali reserve is lower than normal. Also called acid intoxication, autointoxication. — acidotic, adj.
See also: Disease and Illness
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.acidosis - abnormally high acidity (excess hydrogen-ion concentration) of the blood and other body tissuesacidosis - abnormally high acidity (excess hydrogen-ion concentration) of the blood and other body tissues
diabetic acidosis, ketoacidosis - acidosis with an accumulation of ketone bodies; occurs primarily in diabetes mellitus
metabolic acidosis - acidosis and bicarbonate concentration in the body fluids resulting either from the accumulation of acids or the abnormal loss of bases from the body (as in diarrhea or renal disease)
carbon dioxide acidosis, respiratory acidosis - acidosis resulting from reduced gas exchange in the lungs (as in emphysema or pneumonia); excess carbon dioxide combines with water to form carbonic acid which increases the acidity of the blood
starvation acidosis - acidosis in which the acidity results from lack of food which leads to fat catabolism which in turn releases acidic ketone bodies
pathology - any deviation from a healthy or normal condition
Translations
AcidosisAzidose
asidoosihappomyrkytys
acidosis
アシドーシス酸性症
산성증
acidosis

ac·i·do·sis

n. acidosis, exceso de acidez en la sangre y los tejidos del cuerpo;
diabetic ______ diabética;
metabolic ______ metabólica.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the different types of RTA associated with hypokalemia, distal RTA may be due to a defect in proximal tubular reabsorption found in the bicarbonate ion (HC[O.
This bicarbonate ion can continuously react with the hydrogen ions present in the solution according to; HC [O.
Determined primarily by the relationship between dissolved carbon dioxide and the bicarbonate ion concentration in the blood.
Sodium bicarbonate and potassium carbonate were used as the pore forming agents as the mechanism of the reaction differs for bicarbonate ion and carbonate ion with acetic acid.
The hydrochemical modelling, performed by the PHREEQC software, showed that sulphate and bicarbonate ions are the main compounds that precipitate barium ion out of the solute, although bicarbonate ion has practically no influence when barium ion concentrations are low (<I 0 mg/L).
The equilibrium between bicarbonate and carbonate ions in water depends upon pH, and bicarbonate ion is the predominant species in the pH range (pH = 7.
Hard water becomes problematic in cooling water and other energy transfer systems because bicarbonate ion is thermally unstable and easily decomposes to carbon dioxide and carbonate ion according to the following reaction:
Presence of silicate and bicarbonate ion could decrease P-buffering capacity by decreasing the values of the parameters K, n, and p.
The next step is to describe that carbon dioxide given off by roots as a product of aerobic respiration reacts with water in the soil solution to form carbonic acid that dissociates to a proton and a bicarbonate ion.
In crocodile hemoglobin, the amino acid residues involved in bicarbonate ion binding are located at the [[alpha].
The buffer is composed of the bicarbonate ion and carbonic acid.