bidialectalism

bi·di·a·lec·tal

 (bī′dī-ə-lĕk′təl)
adj.
Using two dialects of the same language.

bi′di·a·lec′tal·ism n.
bi′di·a·lec′tal·ist n.

bidialectalism

(ˌbaɪdaɪəˈlɛktəlɪzəm)
n
(Linguistics) the state of being bidialectal
References in periodicals archive ?
E 1972, 'Bilingualism, Bidialectalism and Classroom Interaction', In CB Cazden, VP John & D Hymes (Eds), The Functions of Language in the Classroom, pp.
John Roy, "The Linguistic and Sociolinguistic Position of Black English and the Issue of Bidialectalism in Education," in Peter Homel, Michael Palij, and Doris Aaronson, eds.
She harps on the need for students to follow history, issues and challenges facing democratic approaches to education as well as research and teaching, hence, Perry-Clark's clarion call is for the materialisation of an Ebonics curriculum (Afrocentricity), which finds detonation in linguistic diversity, bidialectalism, code-switching, ESL, multiligualism, linguistic pluralism, language attitudes, language rights, exploration of languages, culture and society, among others.
Terms such as bidialectalism, dialect levelling, dialect obsolescence, language shift and hyperdialectalism have all been used in the literature to highlight certain facets of the current language situation as well as general trends in intergenerational linguistic transmission as tracked contemporaneously by researchers (Tait 2001; Van Leyden 2004; Sundkvist 2011; Smith and Durham 2011 and 2012).
Bilingualism, bidialectalism, and classroom interaction.
The authors are advocates of social justice, and the truth of the above is inescapable; however, the link between facility in standard English, literacy, and achievement on standardized tests means that for African American students, bilingualism or bidialectalism must be offered as an immediate survival mechanism because students cannot wait until we have a just and equitable society to prepare themselves for the demands of the workplace.
Bidialectalism describes a person's ability to effortlessly change between two different speaking styles based on the social expectations for a given situation.
Attitudes of sixth-grade teachers toward standard and nonstandard dialects, bidialectalism, and sociolinguistics.
An extensive literature review is provided to bolster the argument that bilingual models applied to the case of bidialectalism point to the usefulness of both Standard English and AAVE.
Racism, language and urban US minorities: Issues in bilingualism and bidialectalism.
James Paul advocates not elimination of regional accents, nor even the entire eradication of those shibboleths popularly deemed so disadvantageous in speech, but instead a form of bidialectalism by which speakers may gain facility in the forms of speech and not have the realization of their true potential impeded, whilst also retaining the speech habits which proclaim rural (and working-class) identity: