biface


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Related to biface: hand axe

bi·face

 (bī′fās′)
n. Archaeology
A bifacial stone tool.

biface

(ˈbaɪˌfeɪs)
n
(Archaeology) a prehistoric stone tool with two faces

bi•face

(ˈbaɪˌfeɪs)
n.
a bifacial tool.
[1930–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.biface - having two faces or frontsbiface - having two faces or fronts; "the Roman Janus is bifacial"
bidirectional - reactive or functioning or allowing movement in two usually opposite directions
Translations
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References in periodicals archive ?
Mobile foragers would have transported raw materials with them, typically 'exotic' types not found locally, or carried replacement items in the form of retouched tools, tool 'blanks', microblade inserts and possibly biface or small blade cores (e.
For example the Stone Age hand-axe, the Acheulean biface, used by our ancestors 500,000 years ago, had been in use unchanged for more than a million years.
Tindale, Norman B 1949 'Large biface implements from Mornington Island, Queensland and from South Western Australia', Records of the South Australian Museum 9:157-66.
appears to be between 13,200 and 15,500 years old and it includes biface and blade technology that may have later been adapted and improved upon by the Clovis culture.
It is shown that within the theoretical framework of Sullivan and Rozen's method, our results seem to indicate relatively intense but small-scale, late-stage biface reduction occurring at the site, strengthening the hypothesis of 9PA7 as a seasonally occupied "hunting camp" where hunters would finish and refinish their weapons, while exploiting the local game resources.
A fragment of a large biface broken during the production process was found alongside plenty of biface thinning and pressure flakes (Fig.
The second yielded a single Middle to Late Woodland Greenville hafted biface, and the third yielded no artifacts.
So far, the Northern Land Use crews have found a hammer stone, a biface tool that could have been either a knife or a projectile, and some other small fragments left behind by people years ago, he said, showing the bagged and tagged artifacts in the basement of the Denali Tok office.
27) The gorilla carries an Acheulian biface or coup de poing, a stone tool now associated with the early hominid Homo erectus.
They consider obtaining the raw materials, the technology of biface knapping, a world typology of large cutting tools, the meaning of cleavers, and regional perspectives.
This lack of utility, and resultant lack of context, lends dry prehistoric titles such as Adze #2, 1988-89; Prismatic Flake, 1989; and Biface Perforator #3, 1988-89, a romantic peculiarity that extends to the works themselves.
One, which has an arched blade, is actually an Archaic biface fragment.