big lie


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big lie

also Big Lie
n.
Repeated distortion of the truth on a grand scale, especially for propaganda purposes.

big′ lie′


n.
a false statement of outrageous magnitude used as a propaganda measure.
[1945–50]
References in periodicals archive ?
And then, in the 1960s, the National Rifle Association turned a corner to eventually become the shrill perpetrator of a big lie claiming every politician who didn't agree with their "anti-gun-grabber" agenda was not fit to be called "American," was not a patriot.
It's a big lie that the relation is not good, a big lie that we don't communicate, a big lie that we don't agree with his positions and his involvement in the dynamic of the team.
A big lie that our relationship is not good, a big lie that we don't communicate, a big lie that we don't agree with his positions and his involvement in the dynamic of the team.
It's a big lie that our relationship is not good," Mourinhotold a news conference on Friday.
The Hitler-Goebbels Thesis makes clear that, when the Leader proclaims a Big Lie, the masses may start out as skeptical.
Julie Mayhew's The Big Lie is a bold, breathtaking novel.
Graham Turpin: "The big lie was of course the implosion of the UK economy, emergency budgets, major tax rises.
That's a big, big lie, he said,' Senator Lacson further quoted his son as saying.
Germany's Nazis were famous for the big lie propaganda technique: If something is said often enough, people will believe it.
My 10-year-old - who's spent his entire life waking up at the same sort of time as breakfast news presenters - has discovered the concept of the Big Lie In during this school break.
Big Lie In a shock The Love Shack by Jane Costello is published by Simon and Schuster, priced PS7.
Consider Joe McCarthy, the Republican senator from Wisconsin, in his heyday in the early years of the second half of the 20th century, when he preyed on the American people's fear of the "communist menace," at the height of the Cold War, by resorting to "the big lie" to further his career - the big lie being a term taken from Hitler's book, Mein Kampf, where you tell a lie so colossal, and repeat it so often, that no person would believe that anyone "could have the impudence to distort the truth so infamously.