big-screen

big-screen

(bĭg′skrēn′)
adj.
1. Having a large screen: a big-screen television.
2. Of or relating to movies shown in theaters: a big-screen adaptation of a television sitcom.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
we've rounded up some of the city's best big-screen venues where you can watch the game on the evening of Saturday, May 26, on what is sure to be a memorable night.
s reaches its st major tournament since 1958 a big-screen fanzone is surely a norainer.
This big-screen adaptation is a warmhearted and witty version that delivers a cosy and comfortable comedy ramble.
Lights, camera, Scotland Our nation on the big-screen Movie special Scotland on the big-screen Enjoy a stunning eight-page special celebrating our country's most famous film locations I've done the tour.
SWANSEA could be reprimanded over showing big-screen replays of an incident involving Stoke goalkeeper Jack Butland on Monday night.
''TVs are more affordable than they've ever been, so a 'supersized' TV today is still far less expensive than smaller screens were three or four years ago,'' says Jamie Bastian, a spokeswoman for Target, which expanded its selection of big-screen TVs to include 70-inch versions this year, up from last year's 60 inches.
The Lego blocks have come a long way from the toy box onto the big-screen in 3D animation film with a highly admirable voiceover cast of Will Arnett, Morgan Freeman, Liam Neeson, Channing Tatum and Elizabeth Banks.
US ACTRESS Dakota Johnson has signed up to play the lead role in the big-screen adaptation of saucy novel Fifty Shades Of Grey - dashing the hopes of a Birmingham actress.
in the shape of a big-screen showing of a World Cup semi-final.
A record 25 big-screen features went into production over the past 12 months.
Huddersfield people will get their chance to take part in big-screen fun and games next week.
It was 1971 when Peter Finch planted his lips firmly on Murray Head's mouth in Sunday Bloody Sunday--the very first big-screen gay kiss in a mainstream movie.