big-timer


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

big time

n. Informal
The most prestigious level of attainment in a competitive field: made it to the big time with his latest film.

big′-tim′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

big-timer

noun
Informal. An important, influential person:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"We view the latest reported foreign drug shipment as a sign that big-timer drug manufacturers and smugglers are becoming bolder with a dwindled local supply as they feel the pressure from the government's campaign against illegal drugs," he said.
Bethpage must have taken a lot out of him as must all the razzmatazz that goes with being a first-time big-timer.
Kenny was never a big-timer when he played for Scotland.
Big-timer Jankauskas, when he's in the mood, is worth his place as well.
Bellotti has been big-time without being a big-timer, invariably poised in the final minutes of a close game, or in the postgame press conference, win or lose.
Dutch legs froze as Fletcher's stunning reverse flick sent McFadden scurrying in on goal and, although de Boer made a desperate late lunge, the former Ajax and Barcelona big-timer succeeded only in helping the ball pop up and beyond the grasp of Edwin van der Sar.
If you want to boast and be a big-timer you have got to go out and perform to let people know you are worth the money.
There were no big-timers, no shouting and bawling at managers.
"That's the nature of the game, the big-timers get away with it from the FA.
This holds true especially in the presence of big-timers like Sanam Saeed, Ayesha Khan and many more.