bight


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to bight: gulf, Great Australian Bight, Bight of Biafra

bight

 (bīt)
n.
1.
a. A loop in a rope.
b. The middle or slack part of an extended rope.
2.
a. A bend or curve, especially in a shoreline.
b. A wide bay formed by such a bend or curve.

[Middle English, bend, angle, from Old English byht; see bheug- in Indo-European roots.]

bight

(baɪt)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a wide indentation of a shoreline, or the body of water bounded by such a curve
2. (Knots) the slack middle part of an extended rope
3. (Knots) a curve or loop in a rope
vb
(Knots) (tr) to fasten or bind with a bight
[Old English byht; see bow2]

Bight

n
(Placename) the Bight informal Austral the major indentation of the S coast of Australia, from Cape Pasley in W Australia to the Eyre Peninsula in S Australia. In full: the Great Australian Bight

bight

(baɪt)
n.
1. a loop or slack part in a rope.
2. a bend or curve in the shore of a sea or river.
3. a body of water bounded by such a bend.
4. a bay or gulf.
v.t.
5. to fasten with a bight of rope.
[before 1000; Middle English byght, Old English byht bend, bay; akin to Middle Low German bucht (akin to bow 1)]

bight

A bend in a coast forming an open bay or an open bay formed by such a bend.

bight


Past participle: bighted
Gerund: bighting

Imperative
bight
bight
Present
I bight
you bight
he/she/it bights
we bight
you bight
they bight
Preterite
I bighted
you bighted
he/she/it bighted
we bighted
you bighted
they bighted
Present Continuous
I am bighting
you are bighting
he/she/it is bighting
we are bighting
you are bighting
they are bighting
Present Perfect
I have bighted
you have bighted
he/she/it has bighted
we have bighted
you have bighted
they have bighted
Past Continuous
I was bighting
you were bighting
he/she/it was bighting
we were bighting
you were bighting
they were bighting
Past Perfect
I had bighted
you had bighted
he/she/it had bighted
we had bighted
you had bighted
they had bighted
Future
I will bight
you will bight
he/she/it will bight
we will bight
you will bight
they will bight
Future Perfect
I will have bighted
you will have bighted
he/she/it will have bighted
we will have bighted
you will have bighted
they will have bighted
Future Continuous
I will be bighting
you will be bighting
he/she/it will be bighting
we will be bighting
you will be bighting
they will be bighting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been bighting
you have been bighting
he/she/it has been bighting
we have been bighting
you have been bighting
they have been bighting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been bighting
you will have been bighting
he/she/it will have been bighting
we will have been bighting
you will have been bighting
they will have been bighting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been bighting
you had been bighting
he/she/it had been bighting
we had been bighting
you had been bighting
they had been bighting
Conditional
I would bight
you would bight
he/she/it would bight
we would bight
you would bight
they would bight
Past Conditional
I would have bighted
you would have bighted
he/she/it would have bighted
we would have bighted
you would have bighted
they would have bighted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bight - a loop in a ropebight - a loop in a rope      
loop - anything with a round or oval shape (formed by a curve that is closed and does not intersect itself)
2.bight - a bend or curve (especially in a coastline)
bend, turn, crook, twist - a circular segment of a curve; "a bend in the road"; "a crook in the path"
3.bight - a broad bay formed by an indentation in the shorelinebight - a broad bay formed by an indentation in the shoreline; "the Bight of Benin"; "the Great Australian Bight"
bay, embayment - an indentation of a shoreline larger than a cove but smaller than a gulf
4.bight - the middle part of a slack rope (as distinguished from its ends)bight - the middle part of a slack rope (as distinguished from its ends)
rope - a strong line
midpoint, centre, center - a point equidistant from the ends of a line or the extremities of a figure
Verb1.bight - fasten with a bight
fasten, fix, secure - cause to be firmly attached; "fasten the lock onto the door"; "she fixed her gaze on the man"

bight

noun
A body of water partly enclosed by land but having a wide outlet to the sea:
Translations

bight

[baɪt] N
1. (Geog) → ensenada f, cala f; (= bend) → recodo m
2. [of rope] → gaza f, laza f

bight

n (Geog) → Bucht f
References in classic literature ?
Bosun's mate, take a bight of the flying-jib sheet, and start this villain if he doesn't confess his sins double quick, ' said the British captain.
Jump ashore and take a turn around a tree and pass the bight aboard
It hangs from the ship's side at the end of a heavy, projecting timber called the cat-head, in the bight of a short, thick chain whose end link is suddenly released by a blow from a top-maul or the pull of a lever when the order is given.
There’s them that says you’re an Indian, and a scalper, but you’ve served me a good turn, and you may set me down for a friend; thof it would have been more ship shape like to lower the bight of a rope or running bowline below me, than to seize an old seaman by his head-lanyard; but I suppose you are used to taking men by the hair, and seeing you did me good instead of harm thereby, why, it’s the same thing, d'ye see?
The king stooped down immediately and picked up the letter, crumpling it in his hand, as he did so; and at the same moment the torches arrived, inundating the blackness of the scene with a flood of light as bight as day.
He trotted across the level deck to Skipper, who, standing erect on wide-spread legs, the bight of the mainsheet still in his hand, was exclaiming:
Then, a hooked iron rod, thrust through the bars, caught and drew the bight of his trailing rope into the hands of the men outside.
He towed his ark around the Solano Wharf and into the big bight at Turner's Shipyard.
It wouldn't be nice, and I might lose an hour in the bight on my way out with the tide.
The Indians landed them and their supplies in a lonely bight of land a hundred miles or so beyond Latuya Bay, and returned to Skaguay; but the three other men remained, for they were members of the organized party.
Yet amongst all the adventurers shipwrecked in all the wild parts of the world there is not one, it seems to me, that ever had to suffer a fate so simply tragic as the man I am speaking of, the most innocent of adventurers cast out by the sea in the bight of this bay, almost within sight from this very window.
The bight of the pack-rope under the dead man's shoulders enabled him to heave the body out of the hole.