bijection


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bi·jec·tion

 (bī-jĕk′shən)
n. Mathematics
A function that is both one-to-one and onto.

bijection

(baɪˈdʒɛkʃən)
n
(Mathematics) a mathematical function or mapping that is both an injection and a surjection and therefore has an inverse. See also injection5, surjection
Translations
bijekce
bijektio
bijection
bijekcija
bijectie
bijektion
References in periodicals archive ?
As we have seen before, in order to define a partial action of a group G on a set X, we have to assign to each element g [member of] G a bijection [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] between two subsets of X such that the compositions of these bijections, wherever they are defined, should be compatible with the group operation.
The proof is based on Corteel and Nadeau's bijection between permutation tableaux and permutations.
This construction produces a simple bijection from [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] to the set [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] of permutations in [F.
A connected graph G (V , E) is said to be (a, d ) -antimagic if there exist positive integers a, d and a bijection Hollander proved that necessary conditions for Cn P2 to be (a, d ) -antimagic.
He showed that there exists an order-preserving bijection between the set of cones in S and the set of left amenable partial orders on S.
It's easy to see that existence of [psi] requires [PSI] to be bijection, we denote [psi] = [[PHI].
Then there is a bijection between the set of subgroups of G/N and the set of subgroups of G which contain N such that:
If this theorem is true it would apparently make hidden variables completely redundant since it would be always possible to define a bijection or relation of equivalence between the [lambda] space and the Hilbert space: (loosely speaking we could in principle make the correspondence [lambda] [?
They obtain explicit diagrammatical formulas for the decomposition of products of divided powers one-morphisms as direct sums of indecomposable one-morphisms, which are in a bijection with the Lusztig canonical basis elements.
2] have shown that there is bijection between a set of Bregman divergences and members of the regular exponential family of probability distributions.
A bijection [lambda]: Q [lambda] Q is a left-regular permutation or right-regular permutation of (Q, *), if for all x,y [member of] Q one has [lambda] (xy) = [lambda] (x) * y or [rho](xy)= x * [rho] (y), respectively.
Then it is easy to check that f is a bijection from the vertex set of [P.