bilabial

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bi·la·bi·al

 (bī-lā′bē-əl)
adj.
1. Pronounced or articulated with both lips, as the consonants b, p, m, and w.
2. Relating to both lips.
n.
A bilabial sound or consonant.

bi·la′bi·al·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bilabial

(baɪˈleɪbɪəl)
adj
(Phonetics & Phonology) of, relating to, or denoting a speech sound articulated using both lips: (p) is a bilabial stop, (w) a bilabial semivowel.
n
(Phonetics & Phonology) a bilabial speech sound
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bi•la•bi•al

(baɪˈleɪ bi əl)

adj.
1. (of a speech sound) produced with the lips close together or touching, as the sounds (p), (b), (m), and (w).
n.
2. a bilabial speech sound.
[1860–65]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bilabial - a consonant that is articulated using both lips; /p/ or /b/ or /w/
labial, labial consonant - a consonant whose articulation involves movement of the lips
Adj.1.bilabial - of or relating to or being a speech sound that is articulated using both lipsbilabial - of or relating to or being a speech sound that is articulated using both lips; "bilabial fricatives"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
bilabial
bilabijaldvousnenik

bilabial

[baɪˈleɪbɪəl]
A. ADJbilabial
B. Nbilabial f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

bi·la·bi·al

a. bilabial.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
features, and various subsets of the phonological inventory (dental emphatics, pharyngeal [??]ayn, liquids, and bilabials) have various effects on the distribution of emphasis, both the diachronic and synchronic perspectives are taken so as to account for the occurrence of emphatic allophones, vowels, and consonants.
The picture was enriched with attention cueing when the speech organs had one of following features: (1) different shapes of lips when producing bilabials, bilabial fricatives, labiodental-fricatives, or stops; (2) nasalization; (3) voiced sounds; and (4) the tongue in dental, alveolar, postalveolar, palatal, velar, or uvular positions.
The tissue mass of lips is greater than the mass of tongue tip that produces /ta/ or a posterior portion of the tongue that produces /ka/ and a greater sensorimotor planning for precise execution of bilabials (Smith, 1978).
Excessive biting reflex causes strong pressure on the nipples, difficulty in latching on, lack of self-stimulation in the oral cavity and, consequently, no chewing reflex, no manual babbling and no sensory patterns of bilabials [p] [b] [m].Intended chewing does not develop [11].
The data above for Samoan reveal that specifically bilabials p and m are preferred in initial position, by a greater than 2-to-1 margin, but labial-dentals f and v have no such preference.
If the articulatory velocity is the primary physiological factor for the voice onset difference, we would expect that the VOT would be shorter for apical alveolar stops than for either bilabials or velars, which is not the general finding.
Both "v" and "f" are letters/sounds made by the lips, thus called (interchangeable) bilabials. The harsh "d" and the softer "th" are both letter/sounds made by the tongue at the teeth ridge, thus called dentals.
unvoiced, plosive and fricative bilabials, together with liquids and