bilirubin


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bil·i·ru·bin

 (bĭl′ĭ-ro͞o′bĭn, bĭl′ĭ-ro͞o′-)
n.
A reddish-yellow bile pigment, C33H36N4O6, derived from the degradation of heme.

[Latin bīlis, bile + ruber, red; see reudh- in Indo-European roots + -in.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bilirubin

(ˌbɪlɪˈruːbɪn; ˌbaɪ-)
n
(Physiology) an orange-yellow pigment in the bile formed as a breakdown product of haemoglobin. Excess amounts in the blood produce the yellow appearance associated with jaundice. Formula: C32H36O6N4
[C19: from bile1 + Latin ruber red + -in]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bil•i•ru•bin

(ˈbɪl əˌru bɪn, ˌbɪl əˈru bɪn)

n.
a reddish bile pigment, C33H36O6N4, resulting from the degradation of heme by reticuloendothelial cells in the liver and at a high level in the blood producing the yellow skin symptomatic of jaundice.
[< German Bilirubin (1864)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bilirubin - an orange-yellow pigment in the bile that forms as a product of hemoglobin; excess amounts in the blood produce the yellow appearance observed in jaundice
animal pigment - pigment occurring in animals
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
bilirubiini

bil·i·ru·bin

n. bilirrubina, pigmento rojo de la bilis.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bilirubin

n bilirrubina
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
This increases the risk of severe hyperbilirubinemia and its complications such as acute bilirubin encephalopathy, and bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction (BIND) in these infants [1].
Bilirubin, as the end product of heme catabolism, has been regarded merely as a waste with potential toxicity for a long time until year 1987 when it was identified as an antioxidant of possible physiological importance [1].
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) defines intensive phototherapy as at least 30mW/([cm.sup.2] nm) in the 430-490 nm band and recommends this to provide rapid bilirubin reduction (7).
Because infant metabolisms aren't resilient enough to break down the toxic chemical bilirubin, it builds up in their systems and causes jaundice.
The team developed an app called BiliScreen and with a smartphone's camera, it uses computer vision algorithms to detect levels of the chemical bilirubin in the whites of a person's eyes.
BiliScreen uses a smartphone camera, computer vision algorithms and machine learning tools to detect increased bilirubin levels in a person's sclera, or the white part of the eye.
Research variables were AST/ALT ratio, prothrombin time, platelet conunt, serum albumin and serum bilirubin. Continuous variables like biochemical markers were analyzed as mean +-standard deviation (+-SD) whereas categorical variables were analyzed as count and percentages using SPSS version 20.0.
Bilirubin, as a product generated by heme metabolism, is an effective scavenger of free radicals and strong endogenous antioxidants factors in the body.
The neonatologist sees yellow in the context of the Bhutani plot, which defines triggers for phototherapy or transfusion based on total bilirubin concentrations in the first 5 days of life (1).
Meanwhile, bilirubin has been characterized as a potent antioxidant (6-8) and has been demonstrated to be negatively associated with oxidative stress (9,10).
ENPNewswire-August 13, 2019--The Johns Hopkins University - More Than Just Jaundice: Mouse Study Shows Bilirubin May Protect the Brain
The company will be reporting the results of a subset of patients with compensated cirrhosis from an ongoing Phase 2 study designed to assess the safety and efficacy of seladelpar at a daily dose of 5 mg or 10 mg in PBC patients who had an inadequate response or an intolerance to ursodiol and a total bilirubin. Cirrhosis was diagnosed using liver biopsy, liver elastography or liver imaging.