bill of fare

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bill of fare

n. pl. bills of fare
1. A list of dishes offered; a menu.
2. A list of items or events in a presentation; a program.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bill of fare

n
(Cookery) another name for menu
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bill′ of fare′


n.
1. a menu.
2. a program of entertainment.
[1630–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bill of fare - a list of dishes available at a restaurantbill of fare - a list of dishes available at a restaurant; "the menu was in French"
bill - a list of particulars (as a playbill or bill of fare)
a la carte - a menu having individual dishes listed with separate prices
prix fixe - a menu listing fixed meals at fixed prices
table d'hote - a menu offering a complete meal with limited choices at a fixed price
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

bill of fare

nlista delle vivande
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
She was to furnish typewritten bills of fare for the twenty-one tables in the restaurant--a new bill for each day's dinner, and new ones for breakfast and lunch as often as changes occurred in the food or as neatness required.
including various bills of fare for dinners and suppers, in every month in the year, and a copious index to the whole.' (And before you think otherwise, The Gentleman's Magazine did not have a centerfold or anything of the sort; it would have been, well, ungentlemanly.)
The people who frequent these ultra-expensive restaurants are branded as VIPs, the newspaper maintained, commenting sourly, "The only reason to count them as VIPs is the fact that they are super-rich and can easily afford high admission fees plus ordering dishes on the 'priceless' bills of fare."