Bill of Rights

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bill of rights

n. pl. bills of rights
1. A formal summary of those rights and liberties considered essential to a people or group of people: a consumer bill of rights.
2. Bill of Rights The first ten amendments to the US Constitution, added in 1791 to protect certain rights of citizens.
3. Bill of Rights A declaration of certain rights of subjects, enacted by the English Parliament in 1689.

Bill of Rights

n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an English statute of 1689 guaranteeing the rights and liberty of the individual subject
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the first ten amendments to the US Constitution, added in 1791, which guarantee the liberty of the individual
3. (in Canada) a statement of basic human rights and freedoms enacted by Parliament in 1960
4. (Social Welfare) (usually not capitals) any charter or summary of basic human rights

Bill′ of Rights′


n.
1. a formal statement of the rights of the people of the United States, incorporated in the Constitution as Amendments 1–10, and in all state constitutions.
2. (l.c.) a statement of the fundamental rights of any group of people: a student bill of rights.
3. an English statute of 1689 confirming the rights and liberties of the people.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bill of Rights - a statement of fundamental rights and privileges (especially the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution)Bill of Rights - a statement of fundamental rights and privileges (especially the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution)
Constitution of the United States, U.S. Constitution, United States Constitution, US Constitution, Constitution - the constitution written at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787 and subsequently ratified by the original thirteen states
statement - a message that is stated or declared; a communication (oral or written) setting forth particulars or facts etc; "according to his statement he was in London on that day"
First Amendment - an amendment to the Constitution of the United States guaranteeing the right of free expression; includes freedom of assembly and freedom of the press and freedom of religion and freedom of speech
Fifth Amendment - an amendment to the Constitution of the United States that imposes restrictions on the government's prosecution of persons accused of crimes; mandates due process of law and prohibits self-incrimination and double jeopardy; requires just compensation if private property is taken for public use
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
U.S.A., United States, United States of America, US, USA, America, the States, U.S. - North American republic containing 50 states - 48 conterminous states in North America plus Alaska in northwest North America and the Hawaiian Islands in the Pacific Ocean; achieved independence in 1776
Translations

Bill of Rights

n˜ Grundgesetz nt

bill of rights

ndichiarazione f dei diritti
References in periodicals archive ?
One place to look for an answer is in the state bills of rights of that era.
This work provides a comparative analysis of non-entrenched statutory bills of rights that can currently be found in four countries: New Zealand, the United Kingdom, the Australian Capital Territory and the Australian state of Victoria.
The emphasis in these Bills of Rights is human-ness, so corporations are unlikely to avail themselves of these rights (which is not the case under the Charter where the encompassing legal term "person" is used).
They need though to be reminded that some of the most oppressive regimes in the world's history have also enacted bills of rights. Indeed, the governments of China, Cuba, Rwanda, Sudan--all of them notorious violators of human rights--have elaborated sophisticated bills of rights.(4) And even Nazi Germany possessed a glossy bill of rights.
They should--the other 12 colonies copied Mason's work, with but few changes, as they drafted their own constitutions and bills of rights. Mason's words are also echoed in our Declaration of Independence (which was presented to Congress more than two weeks after the Virginia Assembly approved the Declaration of Rights).
Furthermore, said Hamilton, bills of rights are appropriate for stipulations between kings and their subjects, but "have no application to constitutions, professedly founded upon the power of the people, and executed by their immediate representatives and servants." "Here," he declared, echoing Wilson, "the people surrender nothing; and as they retain every thing they have no need of reservations." And in words, quoting the opening phrases of the Constitution, Hamilton continued: WE, THE PEOPLE of the United States, to secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity do ordain and establish this Constitution' ...