binder


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bind·er

 (bīn′dər)
n.
1. One that binds, especially a bookbinder.
2. Something, such as a cord, used to bind.
3. A notebook cover with rings or clamps for holding sheets of paper.
4. Something, such as the latex in certain paints, that creates uniform consistency, solidification, or cohesion.
5.
a. A machine that reaps and ties grain.
b. An attachment on a reaping machine that ties grain in bundles.
6. Law
a. A payment or written statement making an agreement legally binding until the completion of a formal insurance contract.
b. An agreement specifying the terms and conditions of a real estate transaction.
7. Ecology A plant, such as a ground cover, whose growth retards erosion.

binder

(ˈbaɪndə)
n
1. a firm cover or folder with rings or clasps for holding loose sheets of paper together
2. a material used to bind separate particles together, give an appropriate consistency, or facilitate adhesion to a surface
3. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding)
a. a person who binds books; bookbinder
b. a machine that is used to bind books
4. something used to fasten or tie, such as rope or twine
5. informal NZ a square meal
6. (Agriculture) obsolete Also called: reaper binder a machine for cutting grain and binding it into bundles or sheaves. Compare combine harvester
7. (Insurance) an informal agreement giving insurance coverage pending formal issue of a policy
8. (Architecture) a tie, beam, or girder, used to support floor joists
9. (Building) a stone for binding masonry; bondstone
10. (Chemistry) the nonvolatile component of the organic media in which pigments are dispersed in paint
11. (Linguistics) (in systemic grammar) a word that introduces a bound clause; a subordinating conjunction or a relative pronoun. Compare linker2

bind•er

(ˈbaɪn dər)

n.
1. a person or thing that binds.
2. a detachable cover, resembling the cover of a notebook or book, with clasps or rings for holding loose papers together: a three-ring binder.
3. a bookbinder.
4. an agreement granting coverage pending the issuance of an insurance policy.
5.
a. a sum of money given as a pledge of intent to purchase a piece of property.
b. a written receipt acknowledging this payment and granting the right to purchase the property.
6. any substance that causes the components of a mixture to cohere.
7. a vehicle in which the pigment of a paint is suspended.
[before 1000]

Binder

An implement to cut grain stalks and tie them in bundles. Row binders were for crops such as corn that were planted in rows. Small-grain binders were for crops such as wheat that were not planted in widely separated rows.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Binder - a machine that cuts grain and binds it in sheavesbinder - a machine that cuts grain and binds it in sheaves
harvester, reaper - farm machine that gathers a food crop from the fields
2.Binder - something used to bind separate particles together or facilitate adhesion to a surfacebinder - something used to bind separate particles together or facilitate adhesion to a surface
adhesive, adhesive agent, adhesive material - a substance that unites or bonds surfaces together
3.Binder - holds loose papers or magazinesbinder - holds loose papers or magazines  
protective cover, protective covering, protection - a covering that is intend to protect from damage or injury; "they had no protection from the fallout"; "wax provided protection for the floors"
4.Binder - something used to tie or bindbinder - something used to tie or bind  
ligament - any connection or unifying bond
Translations
binder

binder

[ˈbaɪndəʳ] N
1. (= file) → carpeta f
2. (Agr) → agavilladora f
3. [of book] → encuadernador(a) m/f

binder

[ˈbaɪndər] n (= file) → classeur m

binder

n
(Agr: = machine) → (Mäh)binder m, → Bindemäher m; (= person)(Garben)binder(in) m(f)
(Typ: = person) → Buchbinder(in) m(f); (= machine)Bindemaschine f
(for papers) → Hefter m; (for magazines also) → Mappe f

binder

[ˈbaɪndəʳ] n
a. (file) → classificatore m
b. (Agr) → mietilegatrice f
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Soteras CCS binder, a new binder technology from Ashland, enables manufacturers to address one of the biggest technology obstacles: heat shrinkage of the battery's separator.
Following are some tips for buying, wearing, and caring for a binder.
The accused, 35- year- old divorcee Binder Kaur, married Labh Singh alias Rajinder Nangal Sohal, a singer, in 2006 and settled down with him in Talwandi Khurd village of Ladhowal area of Ludhiana.
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IN THIS article the effects of a new breast binder technology on post breast operation patients will be evaluated in comparison with the conventional crepe bandage.
In the 1990s, a new binder specification was introduced, the Superpave binder specification.
SAN DIEGO - Gynecologic surgery patients at the highest risk for postoperative complications who wore an abdominopelvic compression binder for 24 hours after surgery had significantly improved ambulation compared with those who did not wear the binder, results from a randomized trial showed.
Test results on binders extracted and recovered from the plant-produced mixes showed that as the RAP content in the mixture increased, the high-temperature grade of the recovered binder also increased, but only by a few degrees (5.
Binder-USA, LP is a subsidiary of Franz Binder GmbH & Co.
I have just finished restoring a McCormick corn binder that I think is about 90 years old.
It was only natural that Scott Binder, senior vice president of Comcast Colorado, would nab the title of 2007 Fittest CEO in the World by winning the CEO Ironman Challenge World Championship in Kona, Hawaii, last fall.