bindlestiff

bin·dle·stiff

 (bĭn′dl-stĭf′)
n.
A hobo, especially one who carries a bedroll.

[bindle, bundle (probably from German dialectal bindel, from Middle High German bündel, from binden, to bind, from Old High German binten; see bhendh- in Indo-European roots) + stiff.]
References in periodicals archive ?
LEAVENWORTH -- The former Bindlestiff cabins have changed hands again.
Brainard's second novel, 'Magdalena,' inspired a stage play, 'Gabriela's Monologue' (produced by Bindlestiff Studio, San Francisco).
While working tech for the Bindlestiff Family Cirkus, the pair was inspired by that downtown variety act's raunchy, cabaret-style aesthetic to create a skit that combined high and low culture.
Street performances by members of Bindlestiff Family Cirkus
Now, I've seen sword swallowing before, most impressively when the Bindlestiff Family circus played the Lucky Dog Music Hall a while back, and I sort of have an academic understanding of how it's done.
Hoboes; bindlestiff, fruit tramps, and the harvesting of the West.
Towards bindlestiff science; Let's all get off the 3:10 to Yuma.
Street's picture of the social world of the bindlestiff at the turn of the century is particularly rich: Tens of thousands of men spent the winters "laid up" in LA, San Francisco, Sacramento and elsewhere in skid-row flophouses, a world of greasy spoons, shoplifting and "Mexican bargain basement" prostitutes, where they dealt with bedbugs, bad teeth and brawling.
It's based on labor Steinbeck did; in the summer of 1922 he had worked on a Spreckels Sugar Company ranch near Chualar along with Mexican, Filipino, and bindlestiff labor.
At the Lower East Side's Present Company Theatorium, one can see the Bindlestiff Family Cirkus, featuring fire-eating fellatio (actually a flaming dildo) and a plate-spinning act wherein the stick is gripped firmly in the performer's vagina.
He was standing in the market place in China on a Saturday morning, with a little peaked hat very much like yours with the rope, and a seamed and weatherbrowned little face, and very short, and hopelessly tangled legs hanging from him all over, and a small bundle bindlestiff bundle, he looked very much like you but smaller and he was old.
Davies and Orwell were to write about another side of life - the world of the tramp, the bindlestiff, the down-and-out, if the respectable classes of the day wanted their literature to be peopled with Beggars' Opera characters-colourful hawkers, raffish cracksmen and merry whores - they were bound to be disappointed.